public company

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Related to Publicly traded companies: Privately held companies

public company

a registered company that can offer its shares to the public. Its memorandum of association must state that it is a public company, that its authorized capital is at least the authorized minimum (£50,000) and that its name ends with plc (or public limited company).
Collins Dictionary of Law © W.J. Stewart, 2006
References in periodicals archive ?
Comment: Tenneco plans to separate the combined businesses into two independent, publicly traded companies through a tax-free spin-off to shareholders that will establish an aftermarket and ride performance company and a powertrain technology company.
Since November 2014, the last time Arkansas Business measured the estrogen fueling the state's publicly traded companies, the number of women directors has grown by more than 40 percent, and the number of all-male boards has been cut in half.
On January 29, 2016, Xerox announced its plans to separate into two independent, publicly traded companies -- Xerox, which will be comprised of the company's Document Technology and Document Outsourcing businesses, and Conduent a business process services company.
Before the audit, the net profit of publicly traded companies stood at BGN 212.731 M.
Federal securities law already requires publicly traded companies to disclose "material" risks and events, including cyber risks and network breaches, and the SEC has long-standing authority to publish "interpretive guidance" to clarify corporate responsibilities, protect investors, and promote fair and efficient markets.
Indeed, publicly traded companies regulated by MSHA must publicly disclose via an 8-K the mere issuance of any imminent danger order issued under Section 107(a) within four days.
Under current law, publicly traded companies are required to report the number of employees they have, but not where these individuals work.
During the August meeting, the IRS explained that the required use of the applicable discount rate for publicly traded companies is not intended to require an automatic adjustment, but simply to prompt the IRS examination team to scrutinize a transaction.
According to the taxpayer's expert, the discount was 58.75%, based on information from Mergerstat Review, which shows control premiums for acquisitions of publicly traded companies. This approach was rejected by the court in favor of the IRS appraiser's method, which relied on a Partnership Spectrum study showing actual sales of partnership interests that primarily owned real estate.
That's why SustainableBusiness.com selects 20 top publicly traded companies each year that have either made substantial progress toward driving sustainability through their business or are leading the way with a technology that can make a significant difference.