public company

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public company

a registered company that can offer its shares to the public. Its memorandum of association must state that it is a public company, that its authorized capital is at least the authorized minimum (£50,000) and that its name ends with plc (or public limited company).
References in periodicals archive ?
Joseph Swedish, the chairman of Indianapolis-based Anthem, a publicly traded company, is set to become the AHIP chairman in 2017.
As a new independent publicly traded company, PayPal is the industry leader in digital payments with its open digital payments platform, and is the most trusted digital wallet brand.
The iPhone maker lost its position as the world's most valuable publicly traded company to Exxon Mobil Corp, which has a market capitalization a few billion dollars above Apple's 380 dollars billion price tag.
Does your company, if it is publicly traded or a subsidiary of a publicly traded company, have such a reliable system or appropriate internal controls in place?
Dian Swastatika, a publicly traded company is 59.9% owned by PT Sinar Mas Tunggal, of the Sinarmas Group.
"We are the first home-use device company to be backed by a publicly traded company that is in the aesthetic marketplace," said Richard Oberreiter, chief executive officer and founder of Costa Mesa, CA-based CLRS Technology.
A subsidiary of the publicly traded company, Coinmach Service Corporation, Super Laundry constructs high quality coin and card operated facilities throughout the United States.
As part of the initiative, training sessions are held for executives within three levels of a CEO post at a top 500 publicly traded company twice annually during the Executive Leadership Council's Annual winter and spring membership meetings.
Credit Suisse is a publicly traded company with more than 60,000 employees, operating in 50 countries around the world.
But industry observers have come to recognize that any publicly traded company must invest heavily in compliance-related issues, or risk serious consequences.
For Lay, who founded Enron's antecedent, Houston Natural Gas, and who had become the public face of what was once the nation's seventh largest publicly traded company, the end must seem personally tragic.