PPP

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Related to Purchasing power parity: Relative purchasing power parity

PPP

abbreviation for PUBLIC PRIVATE PARTNERSHIP.
References in periodicals archive ?
Rush, Mark, and Steven Husted, 1985, "Purchasing power parity in the long run." Canadian Journal of Economics 18, 137-45.
Papadopoulas and Zis in discussing the flexible monetary model states that the model is based on the assumption of Purchasing Power Parity hold constantly and demand for money functions of the domestic and foreign economies are stable.
"I remember purchasing power parity was about 100, so when the yen was more than 140, it was extremely weak."
(1992) A Time Series Approach to the Productivity Bias Hypothesis in Purchasing Power Parity. Kyklos 45: 227-36.
This paper examines the case of New Zealand exchange rate policy in the 1920s and early 1930s as an example of the international transmission of Keynes's ever-changing position on exchange rate manipulation, purchasing power parity and recovery policy.
"Purchasing Power Parity based on Effective Exchange Rate and Cointegration: 25 LDCs' Experience with its Absolute Formulation," World Development, 21, June, pp.
From this analysis, it appears that the price level elasticity of aggregate demand has significance in regard to the determination of the equilibrium rate of exchange when the exchange rate is examined with the purchasing power parity theory.
These issuers would stabilize the fastest under peso levels closer to purchasing power parity.
The UN Millennium Developments should also incorporate Global citizenship and Single World as part of their agenda.According to PWC report, World in 2050 The BRICS and beyond: prospects, challenges and opportunities, India is expected to remain at the third place both in 2030 and 2050 in terms of GDP at purchasing power parity (PPP) terms.
"Sustained high growth since economic reforms and liberalisation introduced in the early 1990s has put India as the fourth largest economy in the world, behind the EU, US, China and Japan, on Purchasing Power Parity," he added.
Turkey's population rose 72 million and became the 15th biggest economy of the world according to purchasing power parity."
There are economists who believe as a matter of principle that purchasing power parity must hold, even in the short-run, despite ample convincing empirical evidence to contrary (as with monetary growth and inflation).