interval

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Related to QRS interval: QT interval

interval

noun abeyance, break, gap, halt, hiatus, interlude, intermission, interregnum, interruption, intervallum, intervening time, lapse, lull, pause, recess, respite, rest, spatium interiectum, spell, truce
See also: abeyance, cessation, discontinuance, duration, hiatus, moratorium, pause, pendency, period, point, recess, remission, space, term, time

INTERVAL. A space of time between two periods. When a person is unable to perform an act at any two given periods, but in the interval he has performed such act, as when a man is found to be insane in the months of January and March, and he enters into a contract or makes a will in the interval, in February, he will be presumed to have been insane at that time; and the onus will lie to show his sanity, on the person who affirms such act. See Lucid interval.

References in periodicals archive ?
Figure 8 Bar Chart showing Average QRS Interval in Athletes and Non Athletes QRS Interval Athletes 98 Non Athletes 90 Note: Table made from bar graph.
Sodium channel blockers including class I antiarrhythmics by blocking inward sodium current can slow depolarization, reduce conduction velocity, and prolong the QRS interval and consequently may increase the risk of arrhythmia [13,16].
02 (a) Participants with a QRS interval [greater than or equal to] 120 ms were excluded from the analyses.
Study subjects whose EKGs showed prolonged QRS intervals had SNPs in common with each other.
Preimplantation rhythm and PR and QRS intervals were recorded with the use of conventional 12-lead electrocardiography.
Since June 2003, CMS has covered ICDs in patients with ischemic dilated car diomyopathy (IDCM), a left ventricular ejection fraction less than 30%, and a QRS interval greater than 120 milliseconds.
They also had to have cardiac dyssynchrony as reflected by a QRS interval of at least 120 msec.
4 mg/dL or more, QRS interval 140 milliseconds or more, and atrial fibrillation.
A prolonged QRS interval has been required for participation in all major CRT trials and is routinely used as a screening criterion for CRT eligibility in clinical practice.
At present, based upon data from the pre-SCD-HeFT era, Medicare will pay for an ICD in a patient who has ischemic heart failure, a left ventricular ejection fraction of 30% or less, prior MI, and an electrocardiogram showing a QRS interval or at least 120 milliseconds, regardless of whether the patient has experienced prior cardiac arrest.
Factors such as age, gender, left ventricular ejection fraction, New York Heart Association class, medical therapy, and QRS interval all failed to affect the basic finding that ICDs save lives.