case of first impression

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case of first impression

n. a case in which a question of interpretation of law is presented which has never arisen before in any reported case. Sometimes, it is only of first impression in the particular state or jurisdiction, so decisions from other states or the federal courts may be examined as a guideline.

References in periodicals archive ?
Trial counsel knows a question of first impression is lurking in the background.
Counsel facing a question of first impression like this should develop a strategy with appellate counsel for addressing the question before the trial court and on appeal.
Counsel Should Plan A Strategy For Addressing a Question of First Impression Long Before Trial
A question of first impression gives trial counsel the opportunity to use the well-reasoned rationale of persuasive authority from other jurisdictions as well as public policy arguments to advocate a client's position.
Trial counsel should not leave a question of first impression to appellate counsel to address on the fly during trial or as an afterthought on appeal.
Many appellate courts are more inclined to exercise their discretionary mandamus jurisdiction to review a question of first impression.
Because an interlocutory appeal will take time, trial counsel should develop a strategy for raising the question of first impression at a time when interlocutory relief is still feasible without affecting the scheduled trial date.
The court noted that the issue of whether a physician's duty to his or her patient continues after the patient is referred to a specialist was a question of first impression in Delaware.
The courts were confronted with a question of first impression.
Addressing a question of first impression, the court held that a custodial parent can recover damages from a nonparent third party who intentionally interferes with the parent's right to raise the child.
Deciding a question of first impression in the state, the Fourth District Court of Appeals held in February that absent an agreement, therapists do not owe a professional duty to adult patients' parents.