quorum

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Quorum

A majority of an entire body; e.g., a quorum of a legislative assembly.

A quorum is the minimum number of people who must be present to pass a law, make a judgment, or conduct business. Quorum requirements typically are found in a court, legislative assembly, or corporation (where those attending might be directors or stockholders). In some cases, the law requires more people than a simple majority to form a quorum. If no such defining number is determined, a quorum is a simple majority.

A quorum also might mean the number of members of a body defined as competent to transact business in the absence of the other members. The purpose of a quorum rule is to give decisions made by a quorum enough authority to allow binding action to be conducted.

In both houses of Congress, a quorum consists of a simple majority of members.

West's Encyclopedia of American Law, edition 2. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

quorum

n. the number of people required to be present before a meeting can conduct business. Unless stated differently in by-laws, articles, regulations, or other rules established by the organization, a quorum is usually a majority of members. A quorum for meetings of corporate boards of directors, homeowners' associations, clubs, and shareholders meetings are usually set in the bylaws. The quorum for meetings of governmental bodies such as commissions and boards are usually set by statute. (See: bylaws)

Copyright © 1981-2005 by Gerald N. Hill and Kathleen T. Hill. All Right reserved.

quorum

‘of whom’, used to denote the number of people required to constitute a meeting legally.
Collins Dictionary of Law © W.J. Stewart, 2006

QUORUM. Used substantively, quorum signifies the number of persons belonging to a legislative assembly, a corporation, society, or other body, required to transact business; there is a difference between an act done by a definite number of persons, and one performed by an indefinite number: in the first case a majority is required to constitute a quorum, unless the law expressly directs that another number may make one; in the latter case any number who may be present may act, the majority of those present having, as in other cases, the right to act. 7 Cowen, 402; 9 B. & C. 648; Ang. on Corp. 28.1.
     2. Sometimes the law requires a greater number than a bare majority to form a quorum, in such case no quorum is present until such a number convene.
     3. When an authority is confided to several persons for a private purpose, all must join in the act, unless otherwise authorized. 6 John. R. 38. Vide Authority, Majority; Plurality.

A Law Dictionary, Adapted to the Constitution and Laws of the United States. By John Bouvier. Published 1856.