Miscegenation

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Miscegenation

Mixture of races. A term formerly applied to marriage between persons of different races. Statutes prohibiting marriage between persons of different races have been held to be invalid as contrary to the equal protection clause of the Constitution.

West's Encyclopedia of American Law, edition 2. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Some may question how much this new racial nationalism amounts to in practice, especially given continued white affluence and economic power.
And what Gerstle calls "racial nationalism" seems sometimes an attribute of the nation or a dimension of national individual identity rather than an evolving political ideology comparable to liberalism or civic nationalism.
Since its inception in the late nineteenth century to its more recent manifestations in the post-Tiananmen era, however, cultural and racial nationalism have very much dominated the cultural and political domains in China.
During World War II, German occupation brought racial nationalism, genocide, and the decimation of traditional cultures to communities across Europe.
However, they advanced competing understandings of urban culture and community, drawing on the growing discourse of racial nationalism to clarify the stakes of lingering injustice.
That reinforced conflicting models of American nationality: the inclusivity of Civic Nationalism versus the white primacy of Racial Nationalism. That is followed by an examination of the multiculturalism emerging from the New Left, among whom American Jews were also "overrepresented." In contrast to the prior statement regarding assimilation, here we now find the New Left and New Right alienated from the myth of Melting Pot (240-42).
They then used their public political voice to advance a form of racial nationalism in an age of Anglo-Saxon expansionism" (199).
Now, Verwoerd's sort of ethnic and racial nationalism looks to him worryingly normal, even a guide to the shape of things to come.
Referring to written sources, supporting his position that racial nationalism was constructed through a dialectical process between intellectuals and 'ordinary people', written text and oral discourse, Glassman keeps referring rather elaborately to ethnic labels, probably in the way they appear in the available written sources.
Lewis's black cultural nationalism in this case is linked with a more overtly patriarchal racial nationalism that stresses biological "purity" and racial "ownership" of women, and assumes the existence of cycles of racial destiny.
Brennan then shifts registers from the exclusionary politics undergirding 'urban entitlement' to the intellectual formations of racial nationalisms. His first stop is the public sphere of newspapers and literature (Chapter 4), in which mostly male writers of the early nationalist period championed race as a mode of belonging and advocated ustaarabu (civilization), maendeleo (development) and a highly gendered sense of pride and honour for the new taifa.