Miscegenation

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Miscegenation

Mixture of races. A term formerly applied to marriage between persons of different races. Statutes prohibiting marriage between persons of different races have been held to be invalid as contrary to the equal protection clause of the Constitution.

References in periodicals archive ?
Some may question how much this new racial nationalism amounts to in practice, especially given continued white affluence and economic power.
5) It is used here to gauge the extent to which the new racial nationalism advances liberal-egalitarian commitments, in particular to liberal democracy and substantive social equality.
It directly challenged the rising influence of conceptions of American racial nationalism by reinforcing the categorical difference between national ties and political citizenship.
Kallen's competing agendas ruptured along enduring fault lines--fixed boundaries versus fluid integration, the critique of racial nationalism in the United States versus the existence of a Jewish homeland in Palestine, and historical ties based on family relationships versus individual autonomy.
Since its inception in the late nineteenth century to its more recent manifestations in the post-Tiananmen era, however, cultural and racial nationalism have very much dominated the cultural and political domains in China.
15) Far from being a manifestation of a vestigial form of xenophobia, these events are an intrinsic part of racial nationalism which have been diversely used in China since the end of the nineteenth century.
She argues that Sarajevo's distinct traditions of multicultural pluralism made community leaders resistant to outside ideas of racial nationalism.
New York Panorama, the first guidebook, warned of "Harlem's peculiar susceptibility to social and political propaganda," using Marcus Garvey's racial nationalism as a case study (141).
Subaltern intellectuals, we learn here, further propelled ethnic nationalism into a racial nationalism.
Equally significant, however, is the thinness of the line dividing this ostensibly racial nationalism from the sort of amalgamationism propounded by the likes of Schuyler and Rogers.
Brennan then shifts registers from the exclusionary politics undergirding 'urban entitlement' to the intellectual formations of racial nationalisms.
Avery strong correlation between race and class has been influential in the development of widely popular racial nationalisms.