Miscegenation

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Miscegenation

Mixture of races. A term formerly applied to marriage between persons of different races. Statutes prohibiting marriage between persons of different races have been held to be invalid as contrary to the equal protection clause of the Constitution.

References in periodicals archive ?
There was a "whitening" movement in Brazil from the end of the nineteenthcentury to the early twentieth century, in which it was supposed racial mixing would produce a white Brazil.
Certainly, an implication from our findings is that policy makers and practitioners need to be wary of viewing racial mixing and mixedness in fixed and essentialised ways when family experience can vary greatly between families, even those who initially seem to share a form of mixing.
While this often entails the suggestion of racial mixing or amalgamation in the canon of foundational novels of Latin America, this is not always the case.
The anthology is divided into four sections, each one focusing on some aspect of racial mixing in film:
She evaluates the claims regarding agency in postcolonial theories of hybridity to clarify the myths about hybridity, arguing that there is a complex web of inter-dependency in racial mixing in "Creole islands" of La Reunion, a French department, and Mauritius, independent since 1968.
Similarly, George Handley observes a thematic preoccupation with racial mixing, interracial violence, and the tracing of genealogical histories that reappears in fictional texts from certain regions of the New World, and asserts that such commonalities must be understood in relationship to the legacies of slavery and the plantation (4).
It took on issues such as racial mixing, immigration, the role of women in politics and Islam.
But Bardot, 69,also spoke out against racial mixing and was worried about the ``infiltration'' of France by Islamic extremists.
But Bardot, 69, also spoke out against racial mixing and expressed worries about the "infiltration" of France by Islamic extremists.
In the book Bardot speaks out against racial mixing and immigration and worries about France being infiltrated by Islamic extremists.
In the first chapter, readers are given a comprehensive history of racial mixing in the United States.
Baton Rouge Community College also opened in 1998 but received special funding because it was created as a racial mixing tool as part of a settlement in a long-running lawsuit.