represent

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Represent

To exhibit or expose; to appear in the character of.

When an item is represented, it is produced publicly. To represent an individual means to stand in his or her place, acting as his or her substitute or attorney.

represent

v. 1) to act as the agent for another. 2) to act as a client's attorney. 3) the state something as a fact, such as "I tell you this horse is only four years old." 4) to allege a fact in court, as "I represent to the court, that we will present six witnesses," "We represent that this is the final contract between the parties." (See: representation)

represent

(Portray), verb adumbrate, characterize, connote, delineate, denote, depict, designate, evoke, exprimere, illustrate, image, indicate, mean, picture, show, signify, stand for, symbolize, typify

represent

(Substitute), verb act, act as broker, act as delegate, act for, act in place of, act on behalf of, act vicariiusly, appear for, be ambassador for, be an agent for, be attorney for, be deputy for, be proxy for, be spokesman for, replace, speak for, stand in the place of, take the part of
Associated concepts: agency, represent a client's interests, represent a defendant, represent a principal
See also: adduce, advise, bare, bear, characterize, communicate, comport, comprehend, connote, construe, convey, copy, delineate, denote, depict, draw, exemplify, illustrate, impersonate, lobby, manifest, portray, purport, render, replace, signify, simulate, specify

TO REPRESENT. To exhibit; to expose before the eyes: to represent a thing is to produce it publicly. Dig. 10, 4, 2, 3.

References in periodicals archive ?
But poetry cannot make death present, and as a result the capacity to re-present death as a means to produce a recuperative or cathartic result maybe understood as the fantasy that foregrounds the metaphysical consolation associated with the concept of mimesis itself.
This initial Heritage Lottery Fund support will mean the cathedral can work up detailed plans to restore, re-present and open up the Magna Carta's fascinating story for visitors long into the future.
enigmatize--unpattern--indart--misrepresent--blunder--misbehave uncharacter flaw immaterialize re-present
Putzel quotes Woolf's lament in "Notes on an Elizabethan Play" that "'a play where nothing happens is an impossibility'" (114-15), an observation that signals the difficulty Woolf found in "incorporating] the evocative power and the immediacy of drama into her own narratives" (115) and that experienced by theater artists attempting to re-present Woolf's texts as plays.
In 2011, we (a group of four NU-Q graduates comprising myself, Ashlene Ramadan, Rana Khaled and Melanie Fridgant) travelled around the Middle East and North Africa (MENA); listening to different kinds of music and tried to re-present the songs by highlighting their different art forms," Farhoud explained.
By using apps that allow the creation on the device of ePubs (Book Creator on iPad, for example), students can re-present their work in a range of formats--comic, newspaper, textbook, narrative --and have these automatically uploaded back to the class library.
In a way, Sedlacek is trying to re-present a tradition that can aid us in the current debate about whether humans are (also, or only?
The court ordered lawyers representing the military judiciary and those representing Ibrahim to re-present on May 29 their arguments in the trial.
A special ceremony hosted by the Welsh Government will take place on the steps of the Senedd this evening, when First Minister Carwyn Jones will re-present the tournament trophy to captain Sam Warburton and coach Warren Gatland.
These executive-mandated changes re-present incremental but vital micro-reforms that complement Mexico s already-impressive macro-reforms of the 1990s, Under Calderon, the tradition of highly professional and competent stewardship of the Ministry of Finance and the Central Bank continue a 20-year tradition, dating to Pedro Aspe and Guillermo Ortiz, respectively.
We turned to Moya McFadzean, Senior Curator of Migration & Cultural Diversity from Melbourne's Immigration Museum, to offer insight on how museums re-present controversial histories to multiethnic societies.
Most valuable, as Russell claims in her introduction, is 'the intellectual reconciliation process' that emanates from all the works in this volume and that comes through collaborative research between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal people interacting with the vast collection of resources available in the State Library of Victoria to reclaim and re-present the histories, stories and experiences of Victorian Aboriginal people.