Reliction


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reliction

n. gradual change of water line on real property which gives the owner more dry land.

RELICTION. An increase of the land by the sudden retreat of the sea or a river.
     2. Relicted lands arising from the sea and in navigable rivers, (q.v.) generally belong to the state and all relicted lands of unnavigable rivers generally belong to the proprietor of the estate to which such rivers act as boundaries. Schultes on Aqu. Rights, 138; Ang. on Tide Wat. 75. But this reliction must be from the sea in its usual state for if it should inundate the land and then recede, this would be no reliction. Harg. Tr. 15. Vide Ang. on Wat. Co. 220.
     3. Reliction differs from avulsion, (q.v.) and from alluvion. (q.v.)

References in periodicals archive ?
Most state cases related to navigable waterways involve problems of natural changes to the watercourses, whether from accretion, reliction, and erosion, or by avulsion.(49) Such changes affect the title of the various riparian parties.
First, the physical difficulty of reconstructing the historic natural water levels in light of their currently flooded condition suggested that reliction and submergence principles settle ownership in the state.(71) The court said:
One scholar asserts: "The rising sea level [from climate change] is neither gradual like traditional accretion, erosion, or reliction; nor is it sudden and violent like traditional avulsion.
to accretion and reliction; and (4) the right to the unobstructed view
reliction is a contingent, future interest that only becomes a
The common law also recognizes that upland owners possess four special or exclusive rights: 1) the right to have access to the water; 2) the right to reasonably use the water; 3) the right to accretion and reliction; and 4) the right to the unobstructed view of the water.
relictions. (142) The Act's Restoration program replaces the MHWL