internment

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To be sure, the relocation camps were "concentration camps," but in the older military sense: camps for concentrating and controlling a particular population.
She sees the relocation camps as concentration camps that were "unjust, unnecessary, and illegal," (p.
Davis's (1982) Behind Barbed Wire: The Imprisonment of Japanese-Americans During World War II and John Tateishi's (1984) And Justice for All: An Oral History of the Japanese-American Detention Camps present young readers with thoughtful realistic accounts of relocation camps.
At the sound of explosions and gunfire, the four armed peasants from the relocation camp immediately fled.
Staples's discussion of Zenimura's dedicated, even heroic, construction of the baseball field at the Gila River Relocation Camp is the highlight of the book.
This account of two second-generation Japanese Americans is based on Takemoto's interviews of his parents, one of whom served in the Army during World War II, despite having been classified as an enemy alien, and the other of whom was imprisoned in a relocation camp.
Her uncle and grandfather are sent to a relocation camp in North Dakota while the rest of them are held in California until they can be sent to Arizona.
it depicts three wealthy Japanese-American sisters - Grace, a self-appointed realist; the assimilationist Chiz, who at one point flaunts a blonde wig and Betty Grable falsies; and the nostalgic Rose, for whom the other two are arranging a marriage - who return from a relocation camp to reclaim their home and lives after their parents' deaths.
Kessler's story of the Yasuis, a Japanese American family interned in a relocation camp during World War II, is an important example of the American experience, reflecting racism, hard work and endurance.
REMEMBERING MANZANAR: LIFE IN A JAPANASE RELOCATION CAMP, by Michael L.
And for Allan Hida, a Californian of Japanese ancestry, the attack on Pearl Harbor was followed by forced internment in a relocation camp.