mother

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mother

see PARENTAGE.
Collins Dictionary of Law © W.J. Stewart, 2006

MOTHER, domestic relations. A woman who has borne a child.
     2. It is generally the duty of a mother to support her child, when she is left a widow, until he becomes of age, or is able to maintain himself; 8 Watts, R. 366; and even after he becomes of age, if he be chargeable to the public, she may, perhaps, in all the states, be compelled, when she has sufficient means, to support him. But when the child has property sufficient for his support, she is not, even during his minority, obliged to maintain him. 1 Bro. C. C. 387; 2 Mass. R. 415; 4 Miss. R. 97.
     3. When the father dies without leaving a testamentary guardian, at common law, the mother is entitled to be the guardian of the person and estate of the infant, until he arrives at fourteen years, when he is able to choose a guardian. Litt. sect. 123; 3 Co. 38; Co. Litt. 84 b; 2 Atk. 14; Com Dig. B, D, E; 7 Ves. 348. See 10 Mass. 135, 140; 15 Mass. 272; 4 Binn. 487; 4 Stew. & Part. 123; 2 Mass. 415; Harper, R. 9; 1 Root, R. 487.
     4. In Pennsylvania, the orphans' court will, in such case, appoint a guardian until the infant shall attain his fourteenth year. During the joint lives of the parents, (q.v.) the father (q.v.) is alone responsible for the support of the children; and has the only control over them, except when in special cases the mother is allowed to have possession of them. 1 P. A. Browne's Rep. 143; 5 Binn. R. 520; 2 Serg. & Rawle 174. Vide 4 Binn. R. 492, 494.
     5. The mother of a bastard child, as natural guardian, has a right to the custody and control of such child, and is bound to maintain it. 2 Mass. 109; 12 Mass. 387, 433; 2 John. 375; 15 John. 208; 6 S. & R. 255; 1 Ashmead, 55.

A Law Dictionary, Adapted to the Constitution and Laws of the United States. By John Bouvier. Published 1856.
References in periodicals archive ?
The convent at the center of Novitiate is run by an imperious Reverend Mother whose cruel tendencies are heightened by stress from the looming changes of Vatican II.
His delightfully sung "So You Want to be a Nun" gives him the opportunity to bring Sister Amnesia's puppet, Sister Mary Annette, onstage, shocking the Reverend Mother with off-color jokes and behavior that Grigaitis deflects with a spirited rendition of "Turn Up the Spotlight."
A former reverend mother at the convent in Baddesley Clinton
Herbert introduces this talent in the first chapter of the novel, where Jessica submits Paul to a test by a Bene Gesserit Reverend Mother in order to discover if he might, in fact, be their messianic Kwisatz Haderach come a generation early.
Indeed, the whole of the Bene Gesserit technology of consciousness is based on general semantic principles, and Herbert illustrates this notion of consciousness, along with the power of language and gesture, very early in the novel when Jessica, Paul's Bene Gesserit mother, brings him to be tested by the Reverend Mother Gaius Helen Mohiam:
In the mid-1980s, Mother Martina returned to Sunderland where she served the community as Reverend Mother for several years.
She said: "When I went to tell Reverend Mother I think I hoped she would say, 'no don't go'.
In the overt story, Reverend Mother Meryl Streep suspects trendy-wannabe Father Philip Seymour Hoffman of "interfering with little boys" (in the language of the period).
It would be a great mistake to take the poem "The Principal," for instance, as merely that simple thing "ironic." Rather it has an earnest, almost oriental formality along with this poet's predilection for the occasional fiat, straightforward statement, what Charles Reznikoff called "recitative," distinguishable from aria: Whenever the principal entered The room everyone had to stand up The boys would bow The girls would curtsy And everyone had to say in unison "good morning Reverend Mother How are you Reverend Mother?"
I WAS going to write about Reverend Mother who said I have to announce that we have a case of gonorrhoea in the nunnery, to which an old nun said: "Thank goodness for that.
Nevertheless, all will enjoy her anecdote-filled accounts of life with the taste elite and her own self-confessions that can border on the hilarious: the time, for example, at age 13 when one of her false eyelashes fell into her soup during lunch with the visiting Reverend Mother Superior, and the horrified lady, mistaking it for a cockroach, rushed it to the kitchen.
She light-heartedly thought of herself as the "reverend mother".