fair trial

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fair trial

a human right or constitutional right to a trial that provides certain practical protections for the citizen. Notable examples are under the US Constitution and the EUROPEAN CONVENTION ON HUMAN RIGHTS. Core concepts involve an impartial judge, effective (and sometimes free) legal representation, a lack of undue delay and freedom from self-incrimination.
References in periodicals archive ?
Any time the defendant's right to a fair trial is destroyed, or the presumption of innocence is taken away from him, it's a tremendous drawback,'' said Hollywood's attorney, James E.
You have a prosecutor taking an active role obliterating his presumption of innocence and right to a fair trial.
citizens with no right to a fair trial addressing the merits of their cases.
Distinction should be drawn between ensuring a fair trial for Simpson, somethin journalists cannot do, and considering Simpson's right to a fair trial, something journalists can do but may not want to do.
Members of Simpson's defense team and others have said the media's coverage of the Simpson murder case has hurt Simpson's right to a fair trial.
Many journalists have argued that Simpson's right to a fair trial is not -- and should not be -- their concern.
To consider a defendant's right to a fair trial is to include this factor among those that influence the reporting of the story.
We are sympathetic to his family and are not excusing her actions, however, TCFV believes that Beets, a woman subjected to lifelong abuse, was denied the right to a fair trial.
SAN FERNANDO - A pending state Supreme Court Case that pits a defendant's right to a fair trial against a witness's right to personal safety will have direct implications in the trial of six Latino inmates charged in the attack of an African-American inmate at the Pitchess Detention Center.
In that case, defense attorneys say, protecting their clients' right to a fair trial becomes even more important.
Detainees should have the right to a fair trial, prompt hearing, and presumption of innocence until proven guilty.
He criticizes America's increasingly draconian response to crime, such as building more prisons and expanding the use of the death penalty, and asserts that a defendant's right to a fair and impartial jury of his or her peers, the right to represent oneself, and the right to a fair trial are in reality not rights at all but, rather, privileges of the powerful and rich and myths for the powerless and poor.