worship

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See: honor, regard, respect

WORSHIP. The honor and homage rendered to the Creator.
     2. In the United States, this is free, every one being at liberty to worship God according to the dictates of his conscience. Vide Christianity; Religious test.

WORSHIP, Eng. law. A title or addition given to certain persons. 2 Inst. 666; Bac. Ab. Misnomer, A 2.

References in periodicals archive ?
Lakota spiritual ceremony is made up of these Seven Sacred Rites (1) as well as other rituals given to the people by Wakan Tanka.
His new book makes a sacred rite of this teenager's discovery of self, eros, and love, one that provides the reader with an exquisite trip into the human psyche.
Religious people have made it perfectly clear they believe marriage is a sacred rite.
The lack of honours was an onerous historical burden and coming to terms with it has long been a sacred rite of passage for young supporters.
IN HIS WHITE CAP, HIS SPOTLESS LINEN SHIRT AND TROUSERS, ARMED WITH A SHINING SPADE, HE PRESIDED OVER HIS STEAMING POT AND MARBLE-TOPPED TABLE LIKE A PRIEST AT A SACRED RITE.
Then a high priest would perform a sacred rite called the "Opening of the Mouth.
Yet these men and women, dressed entirely in indigo blue cloth, perform their Wedding Dance like the sacred rite it is.
Being the champion cheese chaser may sound a rather strange ambition to you or me but to this Cotswold village it is a sacred rite and a quiet assertion of identity.
With the innovations, however, come concerns that tinkering with democracy's most sacred rite may have unwelcome results, including higher costs, increased risk of fraud, and a loss of community spirit.
Distinguished Hindu statesman Rajan Zed, in a statement in Nevada (USA) today, said that as Brand-Perry followed Hindu rituals and traditions in the wedding, they should have taken marriage seriously as it was a sacred rite in Hinduism.
Much to the shock of many in Westwood, the Bruins are not in the tournament each year via some sacred rite.
Thus to convey the sense of something both timeless and newly discovered, Laib, in this installation as in many of his earlier works, eschewed making reference to a particular religion or sacred rite in favor of creating an atmosphere of seductive, polymorphous spirituality.