Sex

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SEX. The physical difference between male and female in animals.
     2. In the human species the male is called man, (q.v.) and the female, woman. (q.v.) Some human beings whose sexual organs are somewhat imperfect, have acquired the name of hermaphrodite. (q.v.)
     3. In the civil state the sex creates a difference among individuals. Women cannot generally be elected or appointed to offices or service in public capacities. In this our law agrees with that of other nations. The civil law excluded women from all offices civil or public: Faemintae ab omnibus officiis civilibus vel publicis remotae sunt. Dig. 50, 17, 2. The principal reason of this exclusion is to encourage that modesty which is natural to the female sex, and which renders them unqualified to mix and contend with men; the pretended weakness of the sex is not probably the true reason. Poth. Des Personnes, tit. 5; Wood's Inst. 12; Civ. Code of Louis. art. 24; 1 Beck's Med. Juris. 94. Vide Gender; Male; Man; Women; Worthiest of blood.

References in periodicals archive ?
Earlier this year, in an attempt to reach a new audience with the popular lessons of Teaching Safer Sex, Planned Parenthood of Greater Northern New Jersey (PPGNNJ) teamed with Fundacion Mexicana Para La Planeacion Familiar (MexFam) to produce El Nuevo Eusenando el Sexo Seguro.
While the condom code was based on individual fear and safer sex, these new strategies must emphasize responsible sex and demand that gay men consider the effect of their actions on the well-being of larger society, not just on themselves.
Although potent antiretroviral therapy is beneficial on a public health basis, patients with no detectable virus in their blood under treatment should not be considered noninfectious and patients should continue with safer sex practices.
Partly because of this, the safer sex ethic also discourages (but does not disallow) asking one's partner about his HIV status, for doing so suggests that the answer received will make a difference to the sexual relationship to be entered into.
Positive behavior change (i.e., positive transition through the stages of behavior change) was associated with positive change in three psychosocial factors: 1) perceived self-efficacy (i.e., confidence that one can practice safer sexual behavior even in difficult circumstances, such as when under the influence of drugs or alcohol or in the company of a new sex partner) (odds ratio [CR] = 1.5; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.1-2.0), 2) safer sex skills (i.e., ability to use condoms and ability to talk to sex partners about sex and using condoms) (OR = 1.5; 95% CI = 1.1-2.1), and 3) perceived peer support for safer sex (i.e., among other homosexual/bisexual men known by the respondent) (OR = 1.4; 95% CI = 1.0-2.0).
Harm-reduction approaches in HIV/AIDS counseling among adolescents address the barriers they have for engaging in safer sex, focus on perceptions that might affect risky behaviors, focus on safe sex planning and end in referral making (Pinto, 2000).
We then used multiple logistic regression to explore whether arousal loss related to safer sex was associated with unprotected sex in the last 12 months, and whether pregnancy-related arousal loss was associated with experience of unintended pregnancy In both models, we controlled for all of the covariates.
This month's edition includes a copy of Exposed, a glossy with explicit images and down-to-earth discussion to help promote condom use and safer sex for gay men, produced by the Terence Higgins Trust.
They may increase the ability of women to negotiate safer sex, which is vital in areas such as sub-Saharan Africa where HIV transmission occurs in the context of deep-rooted gender inequality.
People can also get advice on safer injecting and the prevention of drug-related death, overdose prevention, blood-borne infections, contraception and safer sex, alcohol misuse and nutrition.
Although many people living with HIV are aware of the harmful health effects of unprotected sex, a significant number still do not follow safer sex practices, such as using condoms.
Mercury has appeared in television ads encouraging the use of condoms which were part of a massive safer sex education campaign organized and funded by the Brazilian health ministry immediately prior to Carnaval in 2005.