Schengen Agreement

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Schengen Agreement

an extension of the policy of the EUROPEAN UNION on free movement of persons whereby the governments of Belgium, Netherlands, Luxembourg, Germany and France agreed to eliminate (as at 1 January 1993) all border controls against persons.
Collins Dictionary of Law © W.J. Stewart, 2006
References in periodicals archive ?
The Schengen Area is a zone which includes 26 EU states (plus Norway) where no internal borders exist and people are allowed to move freely.
The Schengen Area is a zone of 26 European countries that do not have internal borders and allow people to move between them freely, including countries like Spain, France, Greece, Germany, Italy and Poland.
These nine months, or any period beyond 10 years, will not be valid for travel to Schengen Area countries.
The system will apply to all non-EU nationals who do not need a visa to travel to the Schengen area, the EU said.
According to the Schengen Border Code, third country passports must have been issued within the past 10 years on the date of arrival, and have at least three months' validity remaining on the date of intended departure from the last country visited in the Schengen area.
The Schengen II agreement regulated, among other things, the competences of the national police authorities in the Schengen Area and formed the basis of a common information system for security authorities.
e controls at the borders within the EU) have been abolished between Austria and Slovakia ever since the latter joined the Schengen Area in 2008.
"We live in the 21st century and must use tools fitting for the 21st century, like fast exchange of information, and not to toy with the freedom of movement of the Schengen area," he said.
The applicant should be a resident at or having entry visa for USA, Canada, Australia, UK or the Schengen area. The residence or visa should be valid at the time of application.
The report, commissioned by the European Parliament, took into account the potential costs of restoring physical borders between countries that are part of the border-free Schengen area, the direct administrative costs stemming from managing those borders and indirect costs triggered by disruptions to trade and travel.