Scottish Parliament

(redirected from Scottish devolution)

Scottish Parliament

by virtue of the Scotland Act 1998, there is a devolved Scottish Parliament as of 1 July 1999. It has at least all the powers of a big local authority (with a tax raising power it has not exercised, yet) and all the pomp, officials and expense of a sovereign parliament. Since its creation it has banned fox hunting and smoking.
Collins Dictionary of Law © W.J. Stewart, 2006
References in periodicals archive ?
I am therefore not surprised that the two candidates for leadership of the Conservative Party are proposing to further undermine the Scottish devolution settlement with a ''department for the union''which will impose UK Government priorities on spending in Scotland - spending on public services such as Scottish health and social care.
Though two decades have passed since Scottish devolution the rusty nuts and bolts of the UK's political system have barely shifted.
I suppose he was taking as a precedent the proposal put forward by the Labour backbencher George Cunningham at the 1976 Scottish devolution referendum that, to be valid, 40% of the Scots would have to have voted; since only 32.9% had joined the majority the result was discounted.
The Lib Dem peer, who was Scotland's deputy first minister from Scottish devolution until 2005, said: "I remember meeting in Edinburgh, Cardiff and by the time it came to the third meeting, in Downing Street I don't think I'm exaggerating to say that Tony Blair spent most of the time looking out the window."
Donald Dewar once led a walkout of Scottish Labour MPs because the Conservatives were not taking Scottish devolution seriously.
"The sheer size of it - more than 33,000 signatures - and the enormous response to our 24-hour survey show the strength of public feeling for protecting Scottish devolution after Brexit.
In retrospect, Scottish devolution was like a puppet show, where the magic works if you can suspend disbelief and ignore the strings.
I WAS surprised, during the runup and subsequent fall-out of the referendum, that there was no reference made to the requirement of the Scottish Devolution Referendum of 1979, that a minimum threshold of 40% of the total electorate (those that can and do vote, plus those that can vote but don't) had to be met for a vote to carry.
I WAS surprised, during the run-up and subsequent fall-out of the recent UK Referendum on EU Membership, that there was no reference made to the requirement of the Scottish Devolution Referendum of 1979, that a minimum threshold of 40% of the total electorate (those that can and do vote, plus those that can vote but don't) had to be met for a vote to carry.
After the failure of the Scottish Devolution Bill in 1978, I was appointed by Labour leader Michael Foot to look at how we could give more say and accountability for our regions, as well as Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland.
He subsequently served on the Smith Commission which outlined the principles and detail of the new Scottish devolution measures.

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