miss

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miss

(Long for), verb desiderate, desire, pine for, reeret the loss

miss

(Overlook), verb disregard, fail to accomplish, fail to attain, fail to catch, fail to hear, fail to perform, fail to reeeive, fail to see, fail to understand, fall short, gloss over, go amiss, go astray, ignore, lack, let slip, let the moment pass, lose, lose an opportunity, miscarry, miscue, misfire, miss a chance, miss the mark, not succeed, omit, overlook, prove unsuccessful, skip
See also: disregard, fail, ignore, lack, lose, miscue, need, neglect, omit, overlook, pretermit, require
References in periodicals archive ?
nace ahi cuando vi a una mujer caminando con los zapatos de tacon en la mano [;J ya habia visto a muchas antes, naturalmente, pero nadie como ella, la segui, cruce unas palabras con ella, y a partir de ahi nace senorita vodka, de ese pequeno viso de realidad yo trabaje en una ficcion, comento Susana Iglesias.
Cuando comence a despedirme la senorita titubeo: "Pero.
El tema fundamental de La senorita de Trevelez es el orden moral social.
Senorita Rumbalita won nicely at Sandown last time out and she looks an ideal type for Aintree.
Perdone usted, senorita --le dijo el gerente al llegar a su lado--, pero en este hotel no permitimos que se tome el sol sin ropa.
SENORITA RUMBELITA - stood out like a beacon on a low-key afternoon at Folkestone, where her high cruising speed was impressive.
As the nameless Senorita, Gitte Lindstrom deployed her pointes like a flamenco dancer's heels, hard against the floor, a contrast to the precise, skimming pointe work typical of Bournonville style.
For example, Senor Sixto Ortiz Martinez would be called Senor Ortiz, and Senorita Ana Maria Gutierrez y Ramos would be Senorita Gutierrez.
j WHO better than that sleazy senorita Rebecca Loos to present a late night "Loose Woman" style show?
Add to that the videos for Like I Love You, Cry Me A River, Rock Your Body, and his latest, Senorita, and here's a DVD no Justin fan should be without.
Mexico'' picks up (sort of) where ``Desperado'' left off, telling through flashback what happened to Banderas' gunslinger and his sexy senorita (Salma Hayek in what amounts to a cameo, albeit a memorable one).
An analysis of the novel, La Senorita de Tacna, by Mario Vargas Llosa, this paper identifies the tactful usage of metafiction.