disorder

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Related to Sexual disorders: personality disorder, paraphilia, Eating disorders

disorder

a disturbance of public order or peace. Its existence may trigger extended police powers.
Collins Dictionary of Law © W.J. Stewart, 2006
References in periodicals archive ?
Hypoactive sexual disorder (HSDD), now termed FSIAD (female sexual interest/arousal dysfunction) is the persistent or recurrent absence of sexual fantasies/thoughts and/or desire for sexual activity.
Moreover, Ponholzer reported that dyspareunia is the most prevalent sexual disorder. In that study, the total prevalence of sexual dysfunction was 29.6% and the prevalence rates of dyspareunia, arousal disorder, orgasmic disorder, lack of satisfaction, and insufficient lubrication were 67.8%, 60.9%, 59.1%, 52.2%, and 50.4%, respectively (33).
Assessment of sexual disorders associated with pain was the only one within the norm.
Good tolerance refers to the condition in which the patient experiences some sexual disorders, but has no worries in this regard.
Nerman offers health advice on a multitude of problems, from adjusting the cranial joints of newborns unable to breastfeed due to birth trauma to people with allergies, sexual disorders, lower-back pain, or certain neurological symptoms.
The ailments treated by him included asthma, leucorrhea, paralysis, external cuts and wounds, pain, stone in kidney or urinary tract, jaundice, gastrointestinal disorders, sexual disorders, enlargement of uterus, inflammation, and edema.
We refer him to a sexual disorders outpatient clinic, which continues to address his deviant sexual interests.
Topics include current paradigms in psychopathology, diagnosis and assessment, mood and anxiety disorders, schizophrenia, eating and sexual disorders, legal and ethical issues, and more.
The researchers found that the number of employers imposing behavioral health exclusions fell or held steady for a few disorders, such as alcoholism, conduct disorders and sexual disorders.
Along with Virginia Johnson, William Masters pioneered research into the nature of human sexual response and the diagnosis and treatment of sexual disorders and dysfunctions from 1957 until the 1990s.
Current review of hypersexual disorders research, along with documented evidence offered by treatment providers, demonstrates that the number of researched and reported "cases" of "sexual addiction" now greatly exceeds documented past research and reporting of several sexual disorders currently defined and classified in the DSM-IV-TR (prominent examples include fetishism and frotteurism).