sex offender

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sex offender

n. generic term for all persons convicted of crimes involving sex, including rape, molestation, sexual harassment and pornography production or distribution. In mosst states convicted sex offenders are supposed to report to local police authorities, but many do not. (See: rape, molestation, sexual harassment, pornography)

Copyright © 1981-2005 by Gerald N. Hill and Kathleen T. Hill. All Right reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
(2) Sexual offenders have a greater prevalence of axis I mental disorders, in particular mood disorders, anxiety disorders, autistic spectrum disorders, paraphilic disorders, and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder.
(25) Although he had no prior convictions, Johnson was additionally charged as a predatory sexual offender under Missouri Revised Statutes section 566.125.5 because he allegedly committed an act against more than one victim.
The specialized area of counseling sexual offenders can be emotionally taxing for counselors, and counselors working with sexual offenders tend to experience burnout at a rapid rate (Moulden & Firestone, 2010).
11.14(b)--FAILURE BY A SEXUAL OFFENDER TO COMPLY WITH REGISTRATION REQUIREMENTS
The prison administration also acknowledged with increasing regularity that the sexual offender might be a special case for medical expertise.
Penal codes criminalizing sexual abuse expanded exponentially, rates of detected sexual offending skyrocketed, and the sexual offender inmate population soared.
District Court judge threw out a new Louisiana law that prohibited sexual offenders from joining, and even looking at, social networking sites.
(20) The resulting community uproar has prompted the passage of legislation requiring sexual offender registration, mandatory community notification, civil commitment, and, more recently, both surgical and chemical castration.
He was also given a Sexual Offender's Prevention Order banning him from unsupervised contact with children under 18 after he pleaded guilty to giving false information between 2008 and this year.
Other exceptions would be juvenile offenders who live with their parents, and sexual offenders who own their own homes or have written leases.
Here Chenier illustrates how Canadian mothers mobilized in groups such as the Parent's Action League (PAL), to defend children's rights and safety from the so-called "predators." Equally, the Canadian state, influenced more by the mothers' groups and by the courts than by the scientific developments, opted for a narrower, conservative interpretation of sexual danger and sexual offenders. For example, unlike Britain, where the Wolfenden Report urged the decriminalization of homosexuality, Canada's 1958 Royal Commission Report refused to heed the expert's advice that homosexual acts amongst consenting adults should be removed from the criminal code.
This is in accordance with what Furby, Weinrott and Blackshaw (1989) concluded in a first systematic meta-analysis of findings on the effects of sexual offender treatment.

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