Shilling

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SHILLING, Eng. law. The name of an English coin, of the value of one twentieth part of a pound. In the United States, while they were colonies, there were coins of this denomination, but they greatly varied in their value.

References in classic literature ?
To supply the demand, the General Court passed a law for establishing a coinage of shillings, sixpences, and threepences.
"Because of the fifteen shillings and the five," they said solemnly.
Six shillings a week does not keep body and soul together very unitedly.
This was perhaps a rich man for Mull; he would have scarce been thought so in the south; for it took all he had -- the whole house was turned upside down, and a neighbour brought under contribution, before he could scrape together twenty shillings in silver.
Four shillings, sir?--four shillings for this remarkable collection of riddles with the et caeteras.
You don't feel nearly so hard up with eleven pence in your pocket as you do with a shilling. Had I been "La-di-da," that impecunious youth about whom we superior folk are so sarcastic, I would have changed my penny for two ha'pennies.
On board the steamer, which happened to be the Cockspur, Daughtry persuaded the captain to enter Kwaque on the ship's articles as steward's helper with a rating of ten shillings a month.
'Four shillings, as I'm a living woman!' she crows: never was a woman fonder of a bargain.
"Twenty shillings!" cries Jones; "why, you just now asked me twenty guineas."--"How!" cries the serjeant, "sure your honour must have mistaken me: or else I mistook myself--and indeed I am but half awake.
Jerry patted me on the neck: "No, Jack, a shilling would not pay for that sort of thing, would it, old boy?"
When she had paid the fare for the last coach, she had only a shilling; and as she got down at the sign of the Green Man in Windsor at twelve o'clock in the middle of the seventh day, hungry and faint, the coachman came up, and begged her to "remember him." She put her hand in her pocket and took out the shilling, but the tears came with the sense of exhaustion and the thought that she was giving away her last means of getting food, which she really required before she could go in search of Arthur.
And for salary,' said Mr Gregsbury, winding up with great rapidity; for he was out of breath--'and for salary, I don't mind saying at once in round numbers, to prevent any dissatisfaction--though it's more than I've been accustomed to give --fifteen shillings a week, and find yourself.