Sodomite

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SODOMITE. One who his been guilty of sodomy. Formerly such offender was punished with great severity, and was deprived of the power of making a will.

References in periodicals archive ?
The word "sweet" for Marlowe, as for his contemporary playwrights, possessed many shades of meaning, among them "close," "tender," "sugared," "homoerotic," and "sodomitical." Jeffrey Masten has demonstrated as much, notably with respect to the last usage in male addresses to males in various early modern documents, including Marlowe's tragedy Edward II.
Hearne was guilty of sodomitical knowledge before I had any acquaintance with him or knowledge of him; which, in the opinion of every judicious thinking man, must plead strongly in my behalf, and that such an experienced practitioner as Hearne was, could easily form a tale ...
(128) Homosexual identity legitimates criminalizing sodomitical acts.
These sections will be examined below, but they include acts coded in the novel as sodomitical, thus underscoring even further the otherizing of the Queen's sexuality in ways that replicate the markers of alterity utilized by the conquistadors in their writing.
sodomitical--'writing, performing a sodomitical reversal, gestures
It was not until the early sixteenth century that Pico della Mirandola's nephew Gianfrancesco argued that devils would and did indeed commit sodomitical acts (Herzig 60).
Doctors diagnosed and treated sodomitical syphilis even as medical discourse maintained "absolute silence on the possibility of transmission through same-sex erotic contact" (93).
However, the Church's teaching is not (and has never been) that sodomitical acts (of whatever description, and whether performed by same-sex or opposite-sex partners) are morally wrong simply because they cannot result in reproduction.
A constellation of Wildean characteristics and semantic markers was affixed to a single male "sodomitical" figure (Holland 2003b, 93).
In the second half of the nineteenth century, he argues, the relationships between mentor and protege, which in ancient Greece were a source of moral solicitude, came increasingly to be seen as sodomitical ones that could disrupt the very basis of social order.
Some of us are so used to hearing this term used in connection with sodomitical transgression that we have perhaps forgotten what it means.
However, these circumstances are independent of the sodomitical conduct, and the interests asserted from these circumstances do not arise from the nature of same-sex or opposite-sex conduct.