SS

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SS

An abbreviation used in the portion of an Affidavit, Pleading, or record known as the statement of venue.

The abbreviation is read as "to wit" and is intended to be a contraction of the Latin term scilicet.

West's Encyclopedia of American Law, edition 2. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
" Neil Van Leeuwen, in charge of Song of Solomon's music, has musical training primarily in orchestral percussion.
"This book is far more than an explanation of the first two chapters of The Song of Solomon," said Lisa Umina, founder and President of Halo Publishing.
Certainly Pilate's verbal echoes are hardly evidence of a direct line of literary descent, a conclusion Morrison would surely balk at given her distaste for such comparisons, (3) but they are also more than an interesting coincidence, especially when viewed within the context of the most obvious, and overarching, linguistic (re)iteration, the novel's title, Song of Solomon, which shares a kinship with "Song of Myself" at the level of grammar and diction; in its riff on biblical scripture; and as a musical trope that resonates well beyond literality.
Tessa Roynon selects Song of Solomon, Beloved, Jazz and Love to suggest that such novels bring about fresh readings of black integrity as they eschew the American legal system by presenting alternative means of social atonement.
Indeed, geographical concerns lie at the heart of Song of Solomon. Guitar, one of the characters in the novel, is acutely aware of the fact that "relationality of social location is inextricably interconnected with relationality of geographical location".
A new play titled Song Of Songs, based on the Song of Solomon from the King James Bible, will be "sensual and sexy" say theatre bosses.
SONG OF SOLOMON | TONI MORRISON THE SEA, THE SEA | IRIS MURDOCH
* Both are notable writers (Song of Solomon, @Amareisreal).
She outlines the theme of the large scale, shared damage of slavery in Beloved and Paradise; individual trauma passed generationally from parent to child in The Bluest Eye, Sula, and Song of Solomon; and the inability to flee racial trauma by physical relocation or isolation in Jazz and Tar Baby.
However, it turns out that Buray's supposed citing of the term "Mohammed" is not from the Torah, the Five Books of Moses, but is from the Song of Solomon, one of the five "scrolls" in the section of the Bible commonly referred to as "Writings," and is actually the corruption of a Hebrew adjective.
The tree is mentioned in Haggai, Song of Solomon, Deuteronomy, Numbers, First Samuel, and especially Exodus.