Speaker


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Speaker

in the constitutional law of the UK, an office as old as, or older than, the 14th century, the main duty of which is to preside over the HOUSE OF COMMONS. Now, the Speaker of the House of Commons is elected by the Commons but on the nomination of the party leaders after wide consultation with ordinary Members. It is a convention that the sovereign's consent is sought and given. The Speaker is usually re-elected in subsequent Parliaments. The Speaker liaises with the Queen and between the Commons and the Lords. See LORD CHANCELLOR.

SPEAKER. The presiding officer of the house of representatives of the United States is so called. The presiding officer of either branch of the state legislatures generally bears this name.

References in classic literature ?
Some strayed from the point, but most of the speakers replied directly to Martin.
There was not a single person in the whole audience who was not overcome, carried away, lifted out of himself by the speaker's words!
Speaker, and bid them do their work?" Ernest demanded.
Charlotte now for the first time observed the speaker, and a blush passed over her face as she courtesied her thanks in silence.
But suddenly it seemed as if the speaker had begun pointing straight at him, as if he had singled him out particularly for his remarks; and so Jurgis became suddenly aware of his voice, trembling, vibrant with emotion, with pain and longing, with a burden of things unutterable, not to be compassed by words.
And you would agree with me in saying that one of them is simple and has but slight changes; and if the harmony and rhythm are also chosen for their simplicity, the result is that the speaker, if hc speaks correctly, is always pretty much the same in style, and he will keep within the limits of a single harmony (for the changes are not great), and in like manner he will make use of nearly the same rhythm?
A yell of delight, in which admiration and ferocity were strangely mingled, interrupted the speaker, and but too clearly announced the character of his fate.
"Oh, go long!" exclaimed the five men in one voice, raising themselves on their hands and elbows, and glaring at the speaker.
The Prince of Saxe Leinitzer bowed low towards the speaker.
It seems to me that there is rarely such a combination of mental and physical delight in any effort as that which comes to a public speaker when he feels that he has a great audience completely within his control.
"I came in for my own pleasure and instruction," she said, "and was so struck by the wisdom of the speakers that I could not help making a few notes."
At last the speakers seemed to have paused and perhaps to have sat down, for not only did they cease to draw any nearer, but the birds themselves began to grow more quiet and to settle again to their places in the swamp.