cycle

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cycle

noun age, alternation, circle, circuit, consecution, course, eon, epoch, era, flow, period, recurrence, recurring period, regular return, regglarity of recurrence, repetitiveness, revolution, rotation, round, sequence, succession
See also: annum, frequency, life, sequence, succession
References in periodicals archive ?
(2011) The influence of chronological age on periods of accelerated adaptation of stretch-shortening cycle performance in pre and postpubescent boys.
(1999) Effect of exhausting stretch-shortening cycle exercise on the time course of mechanical behaviour in the drop jump: possible role of muscle damage.
Stretch-shortening cycle fatigue has been attributed to changes in the myotatic stretch reflex because of observation of declining knee eccentric forces and muscle stiffness combined with decreased reflex sensitivity, but other factors are also active and complicate the interpretation of stretch-shortening cycle fatigue (Nicol et al., 2006).
(2003) Comparison of force-velocity relationship of vastus lateralis muscle in isokinetic and in stretch-shortening cycle exercise.
Earlier studies using voluntary movements have already suggested that stretch-shortening cycle (SSC) exercise performed with maximal intensity induce HF fatigue (Jereb and Strojnik, 2001; Strojnik and Komi, 1998; Tomazin et al., 2008), while concentric (CON) exercise with maximal intensity (Jereb and Strojnik, 2003) and SSC exercise with submaximal intensity (Strojnik and Komi, 2000) induced LF fatigue.
The impairment of muscle function, however, was attenuated when the stretch-shortening cycle was used in vertical jumping performance (Byrne and Eston, 2002).
Previous animal (Mutungi and Ranatunga, 1998) as well as human (McNair et al., 2001; Avela et al., 2004; Yeh et al., 2007) studies have shown a decrease in MTU or muscle stiffness that underwent repetitive and passive stretch-shortening cycles. In these previous studies, to undergo repetitive and passive stretch-shortening of the plantar flexors, the ankle joint was dorsi-flexed in a large range from the anatomical position or plantar flexion of 20[degrees] to around the maximum dorsiflexion range of motion (DFROM) angle (McNair et al., 2001; Yeh et al., 2007).