industrial dispute

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Related to Strike action: work stoppage, strikebreaking

industrial dispute

a dispute between employers and employees or more likely the organizations representing one or both groups. The dispute should relate wholly or mainly to terms and conditions of work. See GOLDEN FORMULAE.
References in periodicals archive ?
UCU Scotland official, Mary Senior, said: "Nobody wants to take strike action, but staff across Scotland feel they have no choice.
About 240 workers voted by 89% for strike action over the original two-year pay deal.
According to him, the strike action which started on December 3, following the refusal of the Federal Government refuses to equally distribute the N23 billion earned allowance between the teaching and non-teaching staff and the non-performance of the Memorandum of Terms of Settlement with the three unions.
As a result, the union have called off the strike action planned for October 14 and 19, and we are pleased to confirm that services will operate as normal for our customers on those days.
The other sites affected by the strike action are in Swindon, Cowley in Oxfordshire and the Rolls-Royce plant in Goodwood, West Sussex.
In readiness, hospital trusts in the region are working to mitigate the effect of the first five days of strike action which Health Secretary Jeremy Hunt has claimed will cause the cancellation of 100,000 operations and postponement of one million hospital appointments nationwide.
A City College spokesman said: We have been notified of a limited amount of strike action by UCU members.
Local fire services are expected to use trained fire officers to both drive and staff fire appliances along with other emergency response vehicles during the strike action.
Members voted by 77% in favour of strike action, while the mandate in favour of industrial action short of strike action was even stronger with 85% in favour.
Gary Pearce, the GMB organiser, has said in a statement, 'GMB negotiators have been in talks to reach an agreement to resolve this issue since the agreed suspension of the strike action scheduled over Easter.
Yet in recent years these militant members, flushed with their taste of power, have ignored union rules and procedures and stampeded men into strike action, quite often without even the knowledge of their own senior union officers.
What can the possible justification be for strike action if the London Underground has agreed to accept all terms of the upcoming tribunal?