Submerged Lands


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Submerged Lands

Soil lying beneath water or on the oceanside of the tideland.

Minerals found in the soil of tidal and submerged lands belong to the state in its sovereign right. The federal government, however, has full control over all the natural resources discovered in the soil under the ocean floor beyond the three-mile belt extending from the ordinary low-water mark along the coast.

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Johns River, the Multistate Trust had to acquire 2.8 acres of sovereign submerged lands owned by the State of Florida.
"The dedication of the Fort George Island property to conservation and the acquisition of the submerged lands to support cleanup of contamination are a win-win for the environment and the citizens of Florida," said Cindy Brooks, managing principal of the Multistate Trust and president of Greenfield Environmental Trust Group, Inc., which is the parent company of trustee Greenfield Environmental Multistate Trust.
Charlie Crist and the Florida Cabinet voted in November to authorize issuance of a long-term easement on state-owned submerged lands to accommodate the undersea pipeline.
Dore, "Valuation of Submerged Lands," The Appraisal journal, (July 2001): 296-300.
The premise of this technique is that the ratio of the net rent of a dry land site to the net operating income (NOI) of the dry land improved property should be similar to the ratio of the net rent of a submerged land site to the NOI of the submerged land improved property.
Alaska State Senator John Torgerson has introduced a bill into the state legislature which would prohibit leases under the Right of Way Leasing Act on state-owned submerged lands in the Beaufort Sea.
Like the Riparian Act, the purpose of the Butler Act was to create and stimulate commerce and to encourage upland riparian owners to improve their waterfront property.[1] In order to accomplish this purpose, waterfront owners were permitted under the act to obtain title to submerged lands adjacent to their uplands by bulkheading, filling, or permanently improving the submerged lands.[2] Although it was repealed by implication in 1951,[3] and expressly in 1957,[4] the Butler Act continues to affect the title to submerged lands that were so improved prior to its repeal.
The MODU is the largest derelict vessel ever removed from state submerged lands under authority granted to the Commissioner of the Texas General Land Office.
"Submerged lands" are public lands lying below tidal waters in the continental United States.