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References in periodicals archive ?
Jerome after the summer, and, based on the timing of the meeting (which fell two days after the holy day of Yom Kippur and a day and a half before Sukkot), were likely consumed with holiday preparation, such as building their sukkahs (Heinrich).
This thought struck me, as I sat in a sukkah and looked ahead to joining you here at Notre Dame, as did the requirement that one eat in the sukkah in the company of others.
The commandment of the holiday is to dwell in the sukkah, so it is important to eat in it and to invite guests to join us.
Thus, the Lindsay administration, on Rackman's suggestion, decided to build a massive sukkah for the dinner.
And yet as an architectural challenge, the sukkah is irresistible.
In my old neighborhood on the Saturday afternoon of Sukkot (Sukkot lasts eight days), you'll see hundreds of people enjoying the annual sukkah walk, strolling, biking, and pushing carriages up and down the streets, admiring the simple beauty of each sukkah, and enjoying the pleasure of one another's company.
He said that, to his knowledge, the group liked the large private courtyard at the unit, which can be used for the ritual Sukkah, along with the fact that a number of followers lived nearby on West Avenue.
Earlier, Jewish musicians had serenaded the Latino visitors with songs in Hebrew and Spanish as they feasted on Sukkot foods in the Sukkah, a wooden slat structure built for the holiday.
Sukkot on Wall Street: An 800-square foot rooftop sukkah overlooks the financial district.
This is uncannily similar to the Biblical idea of the sukkah which, far from being owned, is rebuilt every year and lived in, "rented," for seven days.
The embrace that my parents felt from the Arabs when they arrived to America found its echo for me within the Jewish community, which welcomed me in as family, ensuring that I always had a kitchen in which to break matzah, and a sukkah in which to shake the lulav.
By staging these elements in such detail, Leader recreates the festival of Sukkot and conceives the entire installation as a sukkah or shelter.