Shipwreck

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SHIPWRECK. The loss of a vessel at sea, either. by being swallowed up by the waves, by running against another vessel or thing at sea, or on the coast. Vide Naufrage; Wreck.

A Law Dictionary, Adapted to the Constitution and Laws of the United States. By John Bouvier. Published 1856.
References in periodicals archive ?
The legend that has been passed on through the generations in Tiberias and the Jordan Valley, however, tells of gold treasure aboard the sunken ship, earmarked for paying the salaries of the Turkish soldiers stationed in the area at the time.
Download Iraq pulls out sunken ship, retrieves 16 victims bodies NNA - Iraqi maritime authorities managed early Thursday to pull out a vessel that had capsized earlier this week following a collision with a foreign ship, and retrieved 16 corpses of its crew members.
Dawn of Infamy: A Sunken Ship, a Vanished Crew, and the Final Mystery of Pearl Harbor
The sunken ship was carrying building materials, wood, sanitary fixtures, tires and fuel barrels.
On the way to the yard the ship developed a crack in one side of its engine room following a collision with a sunken ship, Hang Ro Bong, when she was attempting to anchor at the B (Bravo) anchorage of the port.
The sunken ship is 10 feet deep and 1, 000 feet off the Sicilian shoreline.
A wooden notebook, which was found in a sunken ship, the replica of which will sail, is considered the Byzantine's invention akin to the likes of the modern-day tablet computer, Daily News reported.
Published on Tuesday, 22 October 2013 13:04 PNN The "Euro-Mid" Observer for Human Rights, with headquarters in Geneva, has revealed that tens of bodies of Palestinian and Syrian refugees remain in the wreckage of a sunken ship off the Italian coast, despite it being more than ten days since the incident.
The confirmed death toll from a ferry disaster in the Philippines rose to 64 on Tuesday as more bodies were found, some of them inside the sunken ship itself.
They bleed off the double page spreads with colour that makes readers feel that they are swimming from the shallow waters near the surface into the deeper playground of a sunken ship. Ages 3-6 yrs.
Television pictures showed the red and blue bow of the sunken ship pointing skyward, surrounded by rescue vessels as government helicopters with search lights circled overhead.
In the foreground is what appears to be the mast of a sunken ship but is more likely to be a derelict part of a wharf left over from the time when Stockton was a port.