Bank

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bank

n. 1) an officially chartered institution empowered to receive deposits, make loans, and provide checking and savings account services, all at a profit. In the United States banks must be organized under strict requirements by either the Federal or a state government. Banks receive funds for loans from the Federal Reserve System provided they meet safe standards of operation and have sufficient financial reserves. Bank accounts are insured up to $100,000 per account by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation. Most banks are so-called "commercial" banks with broad powers. In the east and midwest there are some "savings" banks which are basically mutual banks owned by the depositors, concentrate on savings accounts, and place their funds in such safe investments as government bonds. Savings and Loan Associations have been allowed to perform some banking services under so-called deregulation in 1981, but are not full-service commercial banks and lack strict regulation. Mortgage loan brokers, and thrift institutions (often industrial loan companies) are not banks and do not have insurance and governmental control. Severe losses to customers of these institutions have occurred in times of economic contraction or due to insider profiteering or outright fraud. Credit Unions are not banks, but are fairly safe since they are operated by the members of the industry, union or profession of the depositors and borrowers. 2) a group of judges sitting together as an appeals court, referred to as "in bank" or "en banc."

Copyright © 1981-2005 by Gerald N. Hill and Kathleen T. Hill. All Right reserved.

BANK, com. law. 1. A place for the deposit of money. 2. An institution, generally incorporated, authorized to receive deposits of money, to lend money, and to issue promissory notes, usually known by the name of bank notes. 3. Banks are said to be of three kinds, viz : of deposit, of discount, and of circulation; they generally perform all these operations. Vide Metc. & Perk. Dig. Banks and Banking.

A Law Dictionary, Adapted to the Constitution and Laws of the United States. By John Bouvier. Published 1856.
References in periodicals archive ?
For the freeway with the design speed of 80 km/h, the ultimate minimum horizontal curve radius of 250 m and general minimum horizontal curve radius of 400 m with the superelevation rate of 8% were selected as the evaluating section.
By comparing the differences between measured data and calculated data [1], we found that most superelevation calculations for debris flow were smaller than the measured value.
The difference between the levels of two rails in the curve is called superelevation and is arranged to compensate a part of lateral acceleration.
* The following criteria were proposed as controlling only on high-speed (design speed greater than or equal to 50 miles per hour, mi/h [80 kilometers per hour, km/h]) NHS roads: lane width, shoulder width, horizontal curve radius, superelevation, stopping sight distance, maximum grade, cross slope, and vertical clearance.
Given the target on the bucket was about 37 cm above the roadway surface, it seems reasonable to conclude that photogrammetric measurements can be used on roadways with grade and superelevation. The distance error along the vertical axis, including ways to minimize it, could be explored further in a future study.
A laser rangefinder can be added as option, as well as superelevation for AGL shooting, maximum elevation being 60[degrees].
Superelevation (e) characterizes the slope of a transversal section and for a local rural road and radii between 45 m and 437 m is always equal to 0.07.
The horizontal curvature in the roadway alignment with varying superelevation also needed to be addressed during the design and geometric plan layout for this bridge.
[7] established an operating speed model for interchange ramps as a function of curvature change rate and superelevation. Zhang et al.
Engineers settled on maximum 3-percent grades and 6-degree curvature, with substantial superelevation, or banking, on curves.