supranational

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supranational

greater than a state. More specially, a supranational organization is different from a superstate or a federation. While it is bigger than a nation, the supranational organization is limited in the functions for which it is responsible. Its first legal appearance was in the EUROPEAN COAL AND STEEL COMMUNITY (ECSC) Treaty in which the high authority was that Community, the precursor of the commission. The treaty obliged the members to refrain from action incompatible with the supranational character of their duties. The Member States were enjoined to respect this supranational character.
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approximation strategy, and even more so for the supranationalism
None of this is to say that supranationalism is a thing of the past.
Supranationalism, in contrast to internationalism, implies a hierarchy, with the supranational level on top.
What has been the dream of European supranationalism for some has turned into the nightmare of foreign economic diktat for others.
"How Supranational is Supranationalism? National and European Socialization of Negotiators in the Council of Ministers," Acta Sociologica 33:4 (1998): 378-408.
If this should be done through supranationalism or intergovernmentalism or a mixture of the two is another matter.
Hayes-Renshaw states that although the Council is the intergovernmental EU institution "par excellence", it is in reality "a unique mix between intergovernmentalism and supranationalism" (20).
Lindseth, Democratic Legitimacy and the Administrative Character of Supranationalism: The Example of the European Community, 99 COLUM.
For if many aspects of the Rome Treaty demonstrate the tenacity of traditional Westphalian notions of sovereignty, there are nonetheless elements of supranationalism and efficacy in the Statute that could prove extremely powerful.
On the other hand, the Russophile forces in the postcommunist successor states are, as several authors point out, the purveyors of a Kremlin-oriented brand of "imperial" supranationalism (Mykola Riabchuk's and Genadz Saganovich's essays).
Though wary of supranationalism, de Gaulle was ready to give up some state powers to a larger European entity as long as that body's authority did not interfere with the sovereignty of the nation-state.