Talmud

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Talmud

the ancient law of the Jews, originally oral but later written down. It is now codified and is influential in dispute resolution among Jews. See DIN TORAH; BETH DIN.
Collins Dictionary of Law © W.J. Stewart, 2006
References in periodicals archive ?
"A Page of the Talmud in the Quixote: Cervantes, Jew, Talmudist, and Cabalist?" Paper presented at the Sephardic Studies Conference, SUNY Binghamton, April 5-7, 1987.
Even so, this multi-volume work can readily tax the attention span of the most dedicated Talmudist and Federalist alike.
As a pre-modern intellectual, Nathan of Gaza is difficult to classify: he is not a rabbi or a Talmudist, or a `mistagogue', or a `proletaroid [sic] intellectual'.
Also quite original is Gary Remer on the Provencal Talmudist Ha-Me'iri, who, reversing predecessors' views, held that morally upright practitioners of all monotheistic faiths should be tolerated.
I can't help wondering why the creators of the 1981 San Diego Women's Haggadah chose to introduce Beruriah, a second-century female Talmudist, in the homiletic passive voice: "It is told of Beruriah...." Even more startling is that locution's appearance in the 1995 Journey to Freedom Haggadah, where the story of contemporary women gender-bending the rules at Jerusalem's Wailing Wall begins: "It is told of...Dr.
Drury hauls out at some length Strauss's remarks on the Jewish predicament past and present, focusing especially on his interpretation of the great medieval Talmudist and philosopher Moses Maimonides.
Gary Remer explores the very important issue of Jewish toleration of non-Jews, pointing out that Jewish law does not deny salvation to non-Jews, does not aim to convert all, and respects righteous gentiles; yet, the Provencal Talmudist Ha-Me'iri expanded Jewish toleration by clarifying that Christians are not idolatrous and that Talmudic regulations concerning trade with the idolatrous are not applicable to Jewish relations with Christians.
Boyarin, a self-described talmudist and postmodern Jewish culture critic (1), reads Paul as a fellow Jewish thinker and culture critic whose theology of law stemmed from "a critique of its social effects and meanings" (49; 52-56).
a craft" during the day and pursue economics in his "Talmudist" ways in the evening [pp.
He made, however, the mistake of lampooning Samuel ha-Nagid, a rising Jewish statesman and vizier in the Berber kingdom of Granada, who was also a talented poet, Talmudist, strategist, and model writer of letters.
Soloveitchik (1932), Talmudist, philosopher, and Rosh Yeshiva of Yeshiva University; Rabbi Moshe Soloveitchik (1929), Rabbi Chaim Heller (z937)5 Rabbi David Lifshitz (1941), Rabbi Shlomo Polachek (1922), and Rabbi Moshe Shatzkes (1941), central rabbinic faculty members of Yeshiva University; Rabbi Yoseph Yitzhak Schneersohn (1940), the sixth Rebbe of Lubavitch; Rabbi Menaham Mendel Schneerson (1941), the seventh Rebbe of Lubavitch; and Rabbi Yoel Teitelbaum (1946), the Rebbe of Satmar.
Second: As Israel experienced a transformation towards religious radicalism, where the Talmudist religious-colonial mentality is now ruling, so was the case on the Arab side where some radical religious groups - excluding the extreme factions such as Daesh (the self-proclaimed Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant) and Jabhat Al Nusra Front - have now replaced the secular Arab resistance movements, pushing their forces forward to face "the Zionist colonial enemy".