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References in classic literature ?
"Yes--that told you to rejoice and be glad, you know; that's why father named 'em the 'rejoicing texts.' "
Mr Allworthy answered to all this, and much more, which the captain had urged on this subject, "That, however guilty the parents might be, the children were certainly innocent: that as to the texts he had quoted, the former of them was a particular denunciation against the Jews, for the sin of idolatry, of relinquishing and hating their heavenly King; and the latter was parabolically spoken, and rather intended to denote the certain and necessary consequences of sin, than any express judgment against it.
Don't forget the Golden Text. Don't lose your collection or forget to put it in.
I sat just as still as I could and the text was Revelations, third chapter, second and third verses.
As many as possible of the poems named in the text (except 'The Dunciad') should be read, in whole or in part.
They made no particular impression on him, but it happened that two or three days later, being Sunday, the Canon in residence chose them for the text of his sermon.
With thy dear name as text, though bidden by thee, I can not write-I can not speak or think-- Alas, I can not feel; for 'tis not feeling, This standing motionless upon the golden Threshold of the wide-open gate of dreams, Gazing, entranced, adown the gorgeous vista, And thrilling as I see, upon the right, Upon the left, and all the way along, Amid empurpled vapors, far away To where the prospect terminates-thee only!
To Father Jape's kindly encouragement and assistance the author of the prose text is greatly indebted.
The text of the poem is in a chaotic condition, and there are many interpolations, some of Byzantine date.
Here is the text of the dispatch, which figures now in the archives of the Gun Club:
De Republics, Atheniensium: Text and facsimile of Papyrus, F.
I find little authority for such a translation; the most equitable translation of the text as it stands is, "Ithaca is an island fit for breeding goats, and delectable rather than fit for breeding horses; for not one of the islands is good driving ground, nor well meadowed." Surely the writer does not mean that a pleasant or delectable island would not be fit for breeding horses?