That

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WITHOUT THIS, THAT, pleading. These are technical words used in a traverse, (q.v.) for the purpose of denying a material fact in the preceding pleadings, whether declaration, plea, replication, &c. In Latin it is called absque hoc. (q.v.) Lawes on Pl. in Civ. Act. 119; Com. Dig. Pleader, G 1; Summary of Pleading, 75; 1 Saund. 103, n.; Ld. Raym. 641; 1 Burr. 320; 1 Chit. Pl. 576, note a.

References in classic literature ?
"That's all to no use, Mounseer Frog, mavourneen," thinks I; and I talked as hard and as fast as I could all the while, and throth it was mesilf jist that divarted her leddyship complately and intirely, by rason of the illigant conversation that I kipt up wid her all about the dear bogs of Connaught.
Come back now, that's a darlint, and I'll give ye yur flipper." But aff she wint down the stairs like a shot, and thin I turned round to the little Frinch furrenner.
But at last he died raving, and they found as he'd left all his property, Warrens and all, to a Lunnon Charity, and that's how the Warrens come to be Charity Land; though, as for the stables, Mr.
"Well, if that's the way I'm agreed, but I don't take no stock in it.
If a man is a nice fellow, that's the only principle I go upon.
"That's enough, cap'n," shouted Long John cheerily.
"Never you mind the place, boy, that's not the question before us.
"Seein' you love your sister so much better than your wife, wby did you want to marry me, that's borne your children for you, an' slaved for you, an' toiled for you, an' worked her fingernails off for you, with no thanks, an 'insultin' me before the children, an' sayin' I'm crazy to their faces.
That's good enough for little rubbishy common things -- specially with gals, cuz THEY go back on you anyway, and blab if they get in a huff -- but there orter be writing 'bout a big thing like this.
That's it, come on!" came a third voice just then, and "Uncle's" red borzoi, straining and curving its back, caught up with the two foremost borzois, pushed ahead of them regardless of the terrible strain, put on speed close to the hare, knocked it off the balk onto the ryefield, again put on speed still more viciously, sinking to his knees in the muddy field, and all one could see was how, muddying his back, he rolled over with the hare.
That's why I begun by tellin' ye about her walkin' again.
"Yes, that's true, it is so," said Stepan Arkadyevitch, laughing good-humoredly.