Bank of England

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Bank of England

established in 1694, the Bank of England is the central bank of the UK. It was nationalized by the Bank of England Act 1946 and acts as the competent authority for the banking sector under regulatory powers conferred by the Banking Act 1987. It now sets interest rates independent of government and in this respect resembles a central bank.
Collins Dictionary of Law © W.J. Stewart, 2006
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at the Old Lady of Threadneedle Street have clearly underestimated both economic growth and inflation in the sceptred isle in 2010.
Bank of Scotland, before this ridiculous merger with a building society, was the UK's oldest clearing bank, only a few years younger than the Old Lady of Threadneedle Street.
Or as the huge banner draped over the steps of the Old Lady Of Threadneedle Street said: "So Many Battles Against The System And Finally It Ends By Itself." The Square Mile didn't feel like the nerve-centre of our banking system yesterday, more the biggest Protest Superstore On Earth - a sort of Placards R Us.
Its title caught my attention immediately because the number crunchers at the Old Lady of Threadneedle Street contrived to put the words "Financial" and "Stability" in the title of their report.