Penalty

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Penalty

A punitive measure that the law imposes for the performance of an act that is proscribed, or for the failure to perform a required act.

Penalty is a comprehensive term with many different meanings. It entails the concept of punishment—either corporal or pecuniary, civil or criminal—although its meaning is usually confined to pecuniary punishment. The law can impose a penalty, and a private contract can provide for its assessment. Pecuniary penalties are frequently negotiated in construction contracts, in the event that the project is not completed by the specified date.

West's Encyclopedia of American Law, edition 2. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

penalty

n. 1) in criminal law, a money fine or forfeiture of property ordered by the judge after conviction for a crime. 2) an amount agreed in advance if payment or performance is not made on time, such as a "late payment" on a promissory note or lease, or a financial penalty for each day a building contractor fails to complete a job.

Copyright © 1981-2005 by Gerald N. Hill and Kathleen T. Hill. All Right reserved.

PENALTY, contr. A clause in an agreement, by which the obligor agrees to pay a certain sum of money, if he shall fail to fulfill the contract contained in another clause of the same agreement.
     2. A penal clause in an agreement supposes two obligations, one of which is the primitive or principal; and the other, is, conditional or accessory.
     3. The penal obligation differs from an alternative obligation, for this is but one in its essence; while a penalty always includes two distinct engagements, and, when the first is fulfilled, the second is void. When a breach has taken place, the obligee has his option to require the fulfillment of the first obligation, or' the payment of the penalty, in those cases which cannot be relieved in equity, when the penalty is considered as liquidated damages. Dalloz, Dict. mots Obligation avec clause penale.
     4. It is difficult, in many cases, to distinguish between a penalty and liquidated damages. In general, the courts have inclined to consider the sum reserved by such agreement to be a penalty, rather than as stipulated damages. (q.v.)
     5. The sum will be considered as a penalty, and not as liquidated damages, in the following cases: 1. When the parties to the agreement have expressly declared the sum to be a penalty, and no other intent is to be collected from the instrument. 2 Bos. & P. 346; 1 H. Bl. 227; 1 Pick. 45 1; 4 Pick. 179; 7 Wheat. 14; 3 John. Cases, 297. 2. When from the form of the instrument, as in the case of a money bond, it is sufficiently clear a penalty was intended.
     3. When it is doubtful whether the sum was intended as a penalty or not, and a certain damage or debt is made payable on the face of the instrument. 2 B. & P. 350; 3 C. & P. 240. 4. When the agreement was evidently made for the attainment of another object, to which the sum, specified is wholly collateral, 11 Mass. 76; 15 Mass. 488; 1 Bro. C. C. 418, 419. 5. When the agreement contains several matters, of different degrees of importance, and yet the sum mentioned is payable for the breach of any, even the least. 6 Bing. 141; 5 Bing. N. C. 390; 7 Scott, 364. 6. When the contract is not under seal, and the damages may be ascertained and estimated; and this though the parties have expressly declared the sum to be as liquidated damages. 2B. & Ald. 704; 6 B. & C. 216; 4 Dall. 150; 5 Cowen, 144. See 2 Greenl. Ev. 258. 1 Holt N. P. C. 43 1 Bing. R. 302; S. C. 8 Moore, 244; 4 Burr. 2229.
     6. The penalty remains unaffected, although the condition may have been partially performed; as in a case where the penalty was one thousand dollars, and the condition was to pay an annuity of one hundred dollars, which had been paid for ten years; the penalty was still valid. 5 Verm. 365.
     7. A distinction seems to be made in courts of equity between penalties and forfeitures. In cases of forfeiture for the breach of any covenant other than a covenant to pay rent, relief will not be granted in equity, unless upon the ground of accident, fraud, mistake, or surprise, when the breach is capable of compensation. Edin. on Inj. 22; 16 Ves. 403; S. C. 18 Ves. 58 3 Ves. 692; 4 Bouv. List. n. 3915.
     8. By penalty is understood, also, the punishment inflicted by law for its violation; the term is mostly applied to a pecuniary punishment. See 6 Pet. 404; 10 Wheat. 246; 1 Gall. R. 26; 2 Gall. R. 515; 1 Mason, R. 243; 3 John. Cas. 297: R. 451; 15 Mass. 488; 7 John. 72 4 Mass. 433; 8 Mass. 223; 8 Com. Dig. 846; 16 Vin. Ab. 301; 1 Vern. 83, n.; 1 Saund. 58, n.; 1 Swans. 318; 1 Wash. C. C. R. 1; 2 Wash. C. C. R. 323; Paine, C. C. R. 661; 7 Wheat. 13. See, generally, Bouv. Inst. Index, h.t.

A Law Dictionary, Adapted to the Constitution and Laws of the United States. By John Bouvier. Published 1856.
References in periodicals archive ?
Our analysis of news stories from the first year of operation of HRRP suggests that the higher the actual penalty, the higher the perceived cost of the penalty, the more likely it is that the hospital would state it has no control over the low-income patients it serves, and the more likely it is that a hospital will describe itself as a safety net provider of hospital services.
6707A penalty led the national taxpayer advocate to express concerns about the penalty in her latest report and has led the IRS to implement a moratorium on collection enforcement of the Sec.
In counting the number of months for computing the penalty, any fraction of a month during which the failure to file or pay continues is regarded as a full month.
(23) If a reportable transaction gives rise to a carryback or carryforward of a loss, deduction, or credit, the penalty shall apply to such carryforward or carryback year, to the extent that any portion of an understatement is attributable to the reportable transaction.
The flank-cross scoring in World Cup '94 were split between aerial crosses (26) and balls played on the ground (16), between balls delivered to the near post (18) and to the far post (24), and between crosses delivered from inside the penalty box (16) and from outside the penalty box (26).
To treat customers equally, Con Edison is proposing that the penalty cost be imposed across the board, even if the boiler is down for servicing.
New section 6662A provides a more stringent set of accuracy-related penalty rules for RTs--increasing the ante from 20 percent to 30 percent for undisclosed LTs and "reportable avoidance transactions" (RATs); and more expansively calculating the "understatement" against which the penalty is applied.
The CPA then could have helped the company prepare and submit a prior disclosure which would notify customs of the omission, thus eliminating the penalty liability.
Another recent development affecting the gains tax is budget legislation that amends the gains tax penalty provisions, temporarily, to give the commissioner additional authority to abate the penalty. The gains tax penalty can be significant as it is assessed at 10 percent of the tax, plus 2 percent per month, not to exceed 25 percent.
6707A(d)(1), the IRS may rescind all or a portion of the penalty if a reportable transaction is not a listed transaction and rescinding the penalty would promote compliance and effective tax administration.
* There is no evidence that raising the penalty rate above an already high 20 percent would increase the efficacy of the current penalty regime.
For other reportable transactions, the penalty can be rescinded only by IRS authority (which cannot be reviewed by a court).