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PATENT, ROMAN. The Roman patents will be considered by taking a view of the persons to whom they may be granted; the different kinds of patents; the cost of a patent; and the obligations of the patentee.
     2.-Sec. 1. To whom patents are granted. Every person, whether a citizen of the estates of the pope or foreigner, man or woman, adult or infant, may obtain a patent for an invention, for an improvement, or for importation, by fulfilling the conditions prescribed in order to obtain a grant of such titles. Persons who have received a patent from the Roman government may, afterwards, without any compromise of their rights or privileges, receive a patent in a foreign country.
     3. The different kinds of patents. In the Roman estates there are granted patents for invention, for improvements, and for importations.
     4.-1st. Patents for inventions are granted for, 1. A new kind of important culture. 2. A new and useful art, before unknown. 3. A new and useful process of culture or of manufacture. 4. A new natural production. 5. A new application of a means already, known.
     5.-2d. Patents for improvements may be granted for any useful improvement made to inventions already known and used in the Roman states.
     6.-3d, Patents for importations are granted in two cases, namely: 1. For the introduction of inventions already patented in a foreign country, and the privilege of which patent yet continues. 2. For the introduction of an invention known and freely used in a foreign country, but not yet used or known in the Roman states.
     7.-3. Cost of a patent. The cost of a patent is fixed at a certain sum per annum, without regard to the length of time for which it may have been granted. It varies in relation to patents for inventions and importation. It is ten Roman crowns per annum for a patent for invention and improvement, and of fifteen crowns a year for a patent for importation.
     8.-Sec. 4. Obligation of the patentee. He is required to bring into [?] his invention within one year after the grant of the patent, and not to suspend the supply for the space of one year during the time the privilege shall last.
     9. He is required to pay one half of the tax or expense of his patent on receiving his patent, and the other half during the first month of the second portion of its, duration.

A Law Dictionary, Adapted to the Constitution and Laws of the United States. By John Bouvier. Published 1856.
References in classic literature ?
When, then, after nearly four hundred years the Romans went away, the people of Britain were still British.
The Romans, though they esteemed the extending the limits of their empire, to be great honor to their generals, when it was done, yet they never rested upon that alone, to begin a war.
But above all, that of the triumph, amongst the Romans, was not pageants or gaudery, but one of the wisest and noblest institutions, that ever was.
It was only the southern half of the island, however, that was won by the Roman missionaries; in the north the work was done independently by preachers from Ireland, where, in spite of much anarchy, a certain degree of civilization had been preserved.
And so it was that the forces under the King of the Romans pushed back the men of Henry de Montfort, and ever and ever closer to the car came the royalists until they were able to fall upon it, crying out insults against the old Earl and commanding him to come forth.
So great was the wrath of Prince Richard, King of the Romans, that he fell upon the baronial troops with renewed vigor, and slowly but steadily beat them back from the town.
The King of the Romans took refuge within an old mill, and here it was that Norman of Torn found him barricaded.
As I ran down the streets to the sea, the coin clenched tight in my fist, I felt all the Roman Empire on my back as well as the Carstairs pedigree.
An active figure ran down the steps of the house and showed under the golden lamplight the unmistakable head that resembled the Roman coin.
"You were talking about yourself," replied the Roman Candle.
"What is a sensitive person?" said the Cracker to the Roman Candle.
The Roman Catholic believes that the Church on earth cannot stand without universal temporal Power.