Talmud

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Talmud

the ancient law of the Jews, originally oral but later written down. It is now codified and is influential in dispute resolution among Jews. See DIN TORAH; BETH DIN.
Collins Dictionary of Law © W.J. Stewart, 2006
References in periodicals archive ?
Heaven and earth, one's ancestors and descendants, one's self and others: these are the foci of the Talmud, Skibell discerns.
Second, the Talmud assumes that the bull which Ezekiel prescribes for the first of Nisan is identical with one of the bulls that the Torah ordains for Rosh Hodesh (the first of Nisan being Rosh Hodesh).
I'll begin with a serious reservation about Freedman's "biography," really a potted history of the role of the Talmud in history.
A discussion is held in the Talmud Pesahim 94a concerning the distance a person can walk in one day.
Mohammad-Reza Rahimi also said that the widespread use of narcotics around the world is rooted in the Talmud as well.
Here then is the foundation for Lieberman and Safrai's assertion that a combination of paganism and tax breaks was a necessary condition, according to the Talmud Yerushalmi, for a fair to be off-limits to Jews.
The subtitle announces the text as performing the Cultural Work of Jewish American Fiction, but the author, well-versed in the Talmud, presumes a religiously educated audience for his book and for Jewish American fiction as well.
Apparently this new blessing was crafted because Rashi objected to having women recite the traditional one, despite the law that forbade Jews from creating new blessings after the Talmud was redacted.
(6) The Talmud interprets the biblical phrase: " Your lips have spoken lies," (7) as a reference to "the advocates of the parties before the judges." (8) In his commentary to Ethics of the Fathers, Maimonides emphasizes that the proffering of legal advice by professional advocates is prohibited: "even if one knows that the litigant to be advised is facing a deceitful and oppressive opponent, it is, nevertheless, forbidden to teach him arguments designed to help him win his case." (9)
The Talmud describes numerous internal controls: donations were segregated according to their specific purposes and donation chests were shaped with small openings to prevent theft.
Shahak draws on the Talmud and rabbinical laws, and points to the fact that today's extremism finds its sources in classical texts which, if they are not properly understood, will lead to religious warfare, harmful to men and women of all religious beliefs.
The Talmud is the compilation of ancient Jewish oral law, and consists of the Mishna and the Gemara.