pillory

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pillory

verb accuse, asperse, attaint, befoul, belittle, berate, besmear, besmirch, bespatter, blacken, blot, brand, bring shame upon, calumniate, cast a slur upon, cast asperrions on, cause a scandal, damage a reputation, debase, defame, defile, degrade, denigrate, denounce, destroy a reputation, discredit, disgrace, dishonor, disparage, expose to infamy, gibbet, give a bad name, hold up to ridicule, hold up to shame, impute shame to, lampoon, laugh at, lower, make fun of, malign, mock, put in a bad light, put to shame, ridicule, run down, scandalize, scorn, smear, smirch, soil, spatter, speak ill of, stain, stigmatize, sully, taint, tarnish, traduce, vilify, vituperate
See also: brand, condemn, defame, denigrate, denounce, disgrace, dishonor, smear

PILLORY, punishment. wooden machine in which the neck of the culprit is inserted.
     2. This punishment has been superseded by the adoption of the penitentiary system in most of the states. Vide 1 Chit. Cr. Law, 797. The punishment of standing in the pillory, so far as the same was provided by the laws of the United States, was abolished by the act of congress of February 27, 1839, s. 5. See Baxr. on the Stat. 48, note.

References in periodicals archive ?
Does A Hymn to the Pillory possess all the requisite elements necessary to claim it as a site wherein penal experience and, subsequently, prison experience, is altered?
Yet, if this poem, through its narrative of internal reformation (the Pillory is reformed within the confines of the poem, and the Pillory undergoes its own internal reformation), possesses the necessary attributes for restructuring how the mind conceives of punishment and incarceration, then it is the pillory, rather than the "old prisons," that has been reimagined and that exists as predecessor to the penitentiary.
Solitary confinement in the pillory was the norm, with the pilloried offender most often standing alone on the platform; only occasionally, with another offender.
Serving time, another aspect of penitentiary experience, is equally a part of the pillory experience: Time, in fact, represented an important aspect of the sentencing; the number of hours, the time of day--all were meant to reflect the seriousness of the crime.
Last, the architectural form that the pillory possessed--a simple wooden post and crossbeam, mounted atop a platform--suggests both the physical structure of the penitentiary, as well as its moral architecture.
Notably, the demise of the pillory concurred with the emergence of the penitentiary.
Of course, Defoe was not singlehandedly responsible for the transformation of the English penal system, nor did he reimagine the pillory from disinterested or impersonal motives.
Defoe, quite understandably, greatly feared the punishment of the pillory--the infamy of being pilloried and the rough justice of the crowd--and he requested that the pillory portion of his sentence be remanded.
Defoe transformed his punishment in the pillory "into a public triumph" (190), by turning to his friends--and to his pen.
Also see John Robert Moore, Defoe in the Pillory and Other Studies, vol.
Apparently, these three busy locations had long been established as primary sites for erecting the pillory.
Two editions of A Hymn to the Pillory are generally available for study: A Hymn to the Pillory, in The Shakespeare Head Edition, The Shortest Way with Dissenters and Other Pamphlets 13:135-49; and A Hymn to the Pillory, in Poems on Affairs of State: Augustan Satirical Verse, 1660-1714, ed.