tradition

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tradition

same as TRADITIO.
Collins Dictionary of Law © W.J. Stewart, 2006

TRADITION, contracts, civil law. The act by which a thing is delivered by one or more persons to one or more others.
     2. In sales it is the delivery of possession by the proprietor with an intention to transfer the property to the receiver. Two things are therefore requisite in order to transmit property in this way: 1. The intention or consent of the former owner to transfer it; and, 2. The actual delivery in pursuance of that intention.
     3. Tradition is either real or symbolical. The first is where the ipsa corpora of movables are put into the hands of the receiver. Symbolical tradition is used where the thing is incapable of real delivery, as, in immovable subjects, such as lands and houses; or such as consist in jure (things incorporeal) as things of fishing and the like. The property of certain movables, though they are capable of real delivery, may be transferred by symbol. Thus, if the subject be under look and key, the delivery of the key is considered as a legal tradition of all that is contained in the repository. Cujas, Observations, liv. 11, ch. 10; Inst. lib. 2, t. 1, Sec. 40; Dig. lib. 41, t. 1, 1. 9; Ersk. Princ. Laws of Scotl. bk. 2, t. 1, s. 10, 11; Civil Code Lo. art. 2452, et seq.
     4. In the common law the term used in the place of tradition is delivery. (q.v.)

A Law Dictionary, Adapted to the Constitution and Laws of the United States. By John Bouvier. Published 1856.
References in classic literature ?
He tells how a British king (to whom later tradition assigns the name Vortigern) invited in the Anglo-Saxons as allies against the troublesome northern Scots and Picts, and how the Anglo-Saxons, victorious against these tribes, soon turned in furious conquest against the Britons themselves, until, under a certain Ambrosius Aurelianus, a man 'of Roman race,' the Britons successfully defended themselves and at last in the battle of Mount Badon checked the Saxon advance.
Wace imparts to the whole, in a thorough-going way, the manners of chivalry, and adds, among other things, a mention of the Round Table, which Geoffrey, somewhat chary of the supernatural, had chosen to omit, though it was one of the early elements of the Welsh tradition. Other poets followed, chief among them the delightful Chretien of Troyes, all writing mostly of the exploits of single knights at Arthur's court, which they made over, probably, from scattering tales of Welsh and Breton mythology.
As none such is on record, it is safe to assume that none existed Tradition,--which sometimes brings down truth that history has let slip, but is oftener the wild babble of the time, such as was formerly spoken at the fireside and now congeals in newspapers,--tradition is responsible for all contrary averments.
The tradition was, that a certain Alice Pyncheon had flung up the seeds, in sport, and that the dust of the street and the decay of the roof gradually formed a kind of soil for them, out of which they grew, when Alice had long been in her grave.
Prime Minister (PM) Saara Kuugongelwa -Amadhila on Sunday said the importance of traditions and customs cannot be overemphasised at the Batswara Mayeyi Annual Cultural festival in the Sangwali, Lyamboloma Constituency, and Zambezi Region.
One-third of people perceive it also as a feast of spring with many traditions, while almost one-fifth regard it as just a holiday without any special meaning.
Not all inherited cultures and traditions are useful and valid - but not all borrowed ones are beneficial either.
Because traditions are not ideological, there could be several kinds within a political community.
This paper looks at the Craig's seven traditions, their influence on the field of communication theories and the shortcomings of Craig's metatheory.
Traditions Hospice of South Houston reported on Tuesday the completion of the acquisition of Hallmark Hospice for an undisclosed value.
The first-order concern pertains to the question of how to relate the various religious traditions, taking into account at least four interrelated--though not always clearly disambiguated--categories: dialogue, revelation, salvation, and epistemology.
From the very beginning of Jesus' ministry, the oral tradition involved several traditions.