Treatise


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Treatise

A scholarly legal publication containing all the law relating to a particular area, such as Criminal Law or Land-Use Control.

Lawyers commonly use treatises in order to review the law and update their knowledge of pertinent case decisions and statutes.

References in periodicals archive ?
Editors Patrick Mullen and Alan Govenar devote most of the space in their "Preface" to a very nervous acknowledgment of the "volatile nature of writing about race in the 1990s," and describe the assembled articles as ranging "from personal memoirs to scholarly treatises."
Acknowledging that Newton had succeeded in solving the mathematical problem but incensed that his own name is not mentioned in a section of Newton's treatise recently read at a Royal Society meeting, Hooke has demanded that Newton give him proper credit in the Principia for the inverse-square law.
Some of the company's treatises include Collier on Bankruptcy, Moore's Federal Practice, Weinstein's Evidence, Milgrim on Trade Secrets, Nimmer on Copyright, and Chisum on Patents.
However, he or she can submit medical treatises. For instance, a "treatise" might be medically related text stating that arthritis often occurs in a previously injured knee.
In the Second Treatise, Locke turned these elements of medieval politics upside down.
Smith claims that Spinoza's Treatise defined a critical challenge to modern liberalism: reconciling the Enlightenment's universalist aspirations with the reality of human difference.
The state law treatise analyzes the laws of each state and the District of Columbia, identifying whether a particular state's law is consistent with federal law.
Galen's Treatise (De indolentia) in Context: A Tale of Resilience
A very similar statement is made by Gearing in his 1663 treatise: "slandering makes a man more like the Devil then any other sin doth," referring also to the word "diabolus" (109).
Synopsis: Some six years after his narrow escape from proscription in 43 BCE, Marcus Terentius Varro, the "most learned" of the Romans, wrote a technical treatise on farming in the form of a satirico-philosophical dialogue.
The Music Treatises of Thomas Ravenscroft: 'Treatise of Practicall Musick' and A Briefe Discourse.