Amsterdam Treaty

(redirected from Treaty of Amsterdam)

Amsterdam Treaty

(EU) the treaty signed in Amsterdam in 1997 that did not come into effect until 1999, making further alterations in the treaties setting up the European Union.
Collins Dictionary of Law © W.J. Stewart, 2006
References in periodicals archive ?
Its stated aim is to "complete the process started by the Treaty of Amsterdam (1998) and by the Treaty of Nice (2001) with a view to "enhancing the efficiency and democratic legitimacy of the Union and to improving the coherence of its action".
All the treaties after the SEA from the treaty of Maastricht in 1992, the treaty of Amsterdam in 1997 right through to the treaty of Lisbon in 2007 were primarily concerned with achieving a closer political union.
In 1997, the Treaty of Amsterdam integrated the Schengen Agreement into EU law, meaning it would also apply to future EU members.
A copy of the draft approved by the Sindh Cabinet available with The Express Tribune refers to Treaty of Amsterdam which came into force on May 1, 1999 and includes a protocol on animal welfare designed to ensure respect for the welfare of animals as they are sentient beings.
The chief minister said that the Treaty of Amsterdam, which had come into force on May 1, 1999, included a protocol on animal welfare, and was designed to ensure improved protection and respect for the animals.
The chief minister said that the Treaty of Amsterdam which came into force on May 1, 1999, includes a protocol on animal welfare designed to ensure protection and welfare of animals.
The Chief Minister said that the Treaty of Amsterdam which came into force on May 1, 1999 includes a protocol on animal welfare designed to ensure improved protection and respect for the welfare of animals as sentient beings.
In 1999 entered into force the Treaty of Amsterdam, which brought a new insight regarding gender issues at EU level, as it introduced for the first time the concept of gender mainstreaming.
The Stability and Growth Pact (Treaty of Amsterdam 1997) amended the Maastricht Treaty, setting a greater emphasis on citizenship and the rights of individuals, and attempted to achieve more democracy in the form of increased powers for the European Parliament, a new title on employment, a Community area of freedom, security and justice, the beginnings of a common foreign and security policy and institutional reform in the run-up to enlargement, without any suggestion of policies for absorbing non-optimality.
It was integrated into the legal framework of the EU with the Treaty of Amsterdam in 1999.
"The legitimacy of Strasbourg is derived not only from law (the Treaty of Amsterdam agreed by John Major states that the parliament must meet there 12 times per year) but, more importantly, from history.