AI

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AI

abbreviation for ARTIFICIAL INSEMINATION.
Collins Dictionary of Law © W.J. Stewart, 2006
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This is why nobody answers the phone anymore.) Eventually, however, bots will probably get so smart that they'll start feigning stupidity in order to get to talk to a person--and pass the Turing Test with flying colors.
In 1950, he developed the Turing test, an experiment designed to evaluate whether or not a machine is able to emulate intelligent behavior equivalent to or indistinguishable from human intelligence.
Since 1950, the Turing Test has been the most recognized test for evaluating machine intelligence.
The invention of the Turing Test (2011) proposes that if a machine can be constructed to perform the same functions as a human, i.e.
However, one could ask as to whether or not it is enough for a system to pass the Turing test in a particular task in order to be as (generally) intelligent as a human.
is sponsoring a competition to encourage efforts to develop programs that can solve the Winograd Schema Challenge, an alternative to the Turing Test developed by Hector Levesque, winner of the 2013 IJCAI Award for Research Excellence.
Turing's original 'test' (now generalized as a 'Turing test') focused on the ability of a human interrogator to distinguish the gender of two subjects (A--a man, and B--a woman) via text based questioning.
The Completely Automated Public Turing test to tell Computers and Humans Apart, or Captcha, is a well-known filter used by sites to keep bots out, and was known to be a fail-safe program that was both simple as well as almost unbeatable.
? CAPTCHA Stands for: Completely Automated Public Turing Test To Tell Computers And Humans Apart Which means: You'll have seen these as a security measure when uploading info to a website.
To test his theory, he proposes a Turing test, which in this case will be to pit the machine intelligence against a PhD student in English, have each of them write an interpretation of the same text, and see if one of the scientists can tell which answer is from the machine and which from the human.
"This experiment is a kind of reverse Turing test for random behavior, a test of strength between algorithms and humans," says study co-author Hector Zenil.
It uses the Turing Test, named after Second World War codebreaker Alan Turing, and the challenge is to convince people they are talking to a real human not a robot.