unicameral

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Related to Unicameralism: bicameralism

unicameral

‘having one chamber’. The term is found in reference to parliaments. Thus, the UK has a bicameral parliament consisting of the House of Commons and the House of Lords, whereas the New Zealand Parliament has a unicameral structure.
References in periodicals archive ?
It does so by first looking at the consideration of unicameralism at the state's Constitutional Convention.
Unicameralism was not an altogether unfamiliar concept to Alaskans when it was first introduced at the Convention.
The Constitutional Convention and Alaska's Flirtation with Unicameralism
The day before the debate on how many houses to include in the new legislature, the Daily Alaska Empire of Juneau published an article proclaiming that "[d]elegates to the Alaska Constitutional Convention are ready to tackle what could be the most controversial issue of the historic get-together." (45) The article noted that although the concept of unicameralism was not on the minds of many delegates when the Convention had begun three weeks earlier, it had swiftly gained momentum over the course of the Convention.
Unicameralism had last been considered for Alaska some four decades earlier when the territorial legislature was being designed.
(52) Convention leaders had deemed it too controversial to be taken up in the early weeks, so discussion of unicameralism had been limited to side conversations among delegates outside the formal proceedings.
Unicameralism is illustrative for the Parliaments of unitary states.
While unicameralism facilitates the legislative process and strengthens the Legislative before Executive, bicameralism presents the following disadvantages (20):
Second, Duterte's obsession for federalism presumes and will trigger Constitutional amendments that may usher in a parliamentary form of government, no term limits, party democracy, economic liberalization, and even perhaps unicameralism.
Thus, as the new President peruses down his laundry list of issues and problems, such as: (1) Constitutional Reforms; (2) Federalism; unicameralism; and parliamentary form of government; (3) job creation; (4) Armed Forces modernization; (5) and tax reforms for which the next president will need to have fresh ideas and decisive actions.
These are (1) the immediate resolution of the Philippine Government and MILF deadlock and statement; (2) the termination of the NPA insurgency through poverty alleviation; (3) the long-term creative and patient negotiations and co-existence with China in the West Philippine Sea dispute; (4) the selective revision and amendments of the 1987 Constitution; (5) the serious implementation of the Reproductive Health (RH) law; and (6) the introduction of federalism and unicameralism.