bluebook

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bluebook

in UK Parliamentary procedure, a government publication bound in a stiff blue paper cover: usually the report of a royal commission or a committee.
Collins Dictionary of Law © W.J. Stewart, 2006
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The Bluebook: A Uniform System of Citation, first published in 1926, was released in its 20th edition in summer 2015.
The Bluebook: A Uniform System of Citation exemplifies hypertrophy in the anthropological sense.
Penelope Pether notes that "[n]ot only do the English lack a uniform system of citation (most law periodicals produce brief and idiosyncratic guides for contributors) but it is also possible to find within as well as among the journals significant variations in citation form." Penelope Pether, Discipline and Punish: Dispatches from the Citation Manual Wars and Other (Literally) Unspeakable Stories, 10 GRIFFITH L.
(1) This may make sense, as the University of Pennsylvania Law Review is one of the four entities (with the Columbia Law Review, the Harvard Law Review, and The Yale Law Journal) that compile The Bluebook, but it is clear that even those schools that have nothing to do with the creation of the "Uniform System of Citation" often rely heavily on the fascinating and frustrating intricacies of The Bluebook's legal citation rules when testing students for placement on the editorial staffs of their legal journals.
Substantial work is already under way on this major change in how legal materials are categorized, and the American Bar Association has recommended A Uniform System of Citation to all jurisdictions for this purpose.
(4.) THE BLUEBOOK: A UNIFORM SYSTEM OF CITATION [sections] 1.2(c), at 23 (15th ed.
At this precise moment-pen in one hand, coffee mug in the other, diplomas from Berkeley and Yale hanging neatly on the wall- you're flipping idly through the Uniform System of Citation to solve the pressing and momentous and socially useful question of whether you should introduce a new footnote with See," or "See Generally."
All courts rely on The Bluebook: A Uniform System of Citation, published by the Harvard Law Review Association.
Prince (legal research, Vanderbilt U., Tennessee) updates again her reference guide for attorneys, legal secretaries, paralegals, and law students on citing legal authorities according to the rules in The Bluebook: A Uniform System of Citation 19th edition, 2010.
When searching for an answer to a citation question, you should first turn to the The Bluebook: d Uniform System of Citation. (2) Legal scholars and practitioners rely on the Bluebook as the "definitive" source of rules for citation in legal documents and law journals.
First, our editors edit each footnote in every article, making sure that footnotes conform as best they can to the standards set by The Bluebook." A Uniform System of Citation. Second, we edit each article for grammar, syntax, and style, preserving as much as possible each author's unique voice.
The world of legal citation has long been dominated by the little blue-covered manual, A Uniform System of Citation, a.k.a., the Bluebook.

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