Verba

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Verba

[Latin, Words.] A term used in many legal maxims, including verba sunt indices animi, which means "words are the indicators of the mind or thought"; and verba accipienda ut sortiantur effectum, or "words are to be taken so that they may have some effect."

West's Encyclopedia of American Law, edition 2. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
In John 1 he rejected verbum and replaced it with sermo (speech), so that the Gospel began: In principio erat sermo, et sermo erat apud deum, et deus erat file sermo.
Dei Verbum and its idea of divine self-revelation duplicate the personal dimension of revelation: the Christian revelation must not be understood as a subject-object relation (a subject recognizes something), but rather as an encounter of two subjects, a mutual mediation of persons (somebody recognizes somebody).
2, 373) seems to have come into Augustine's consciousness in this Sermon, but it echoes a passage in the De trinitate XV, 17-19, where we read that it is the mental verbum (verb) that lives in us and distinguishes itself from the external word.
Indeed, Dei Verbum affirms that the sacred authors wrote the four Gospels, selecting some things from the many which had been handed on by word of mouth or in writing, reducing some of them to a synthesis, explaining some things in view of the situation of their churches, and preserving the form of proclamation but always in such fashion that they told us the honest truth about Jesus.
Verbum Domini comprised some 150 items, including rare biblical manuscripts and related materials dating as far back as the third century B.c.
What is clear is that the meaning of a word written as verbum is not fixed.
The first part (Chapters 1-6) examines the history of logos and verbum in a number of key historical figures; this history then informs the line-byline reading of "Sprache und Verbum" that comprises the second part of the book (Chapters 7-11).
This theme, significantly, was affirmed in Catholic theology for the first time at a magisterial level at the Second Vatican Council in the Dogmatic Constitution on Divine Revelation (Dei Verbum): "But the task of giving an authentic interpretation of the Word of God, whether in its written form or in the form of Tradition, has been entrusted to the living teaching office of the Church alone.
Rajan Zed further said that in 200-page "Verbum Domini" (The Word of the Lord) apostolic exhortation released on November 11, Pope Benedict wrote about "the sense of the sacred, sacrifice and fasting..." in Hinduism.