Violently


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VIOLENTLY, pleading. This word was formerly supposed to be necessary in an indictment, in order to charge a robbery from the person, but it has been holden unnecessary. 2 East, P. C. 784; 1 Chit. Cr. Law, *244. The words "feloniously and against the will," usually introduced in such indictments, seem to be sufficient. It is usual also to aver a putting in fear, though this does not seem to be requisite. Id.

References in classic literature ?
when it grunted again, so violently, that she looked down into its face in some alarm.
It was the powerful reflection from the glass partition sent violently back to the sheets of the lantern.
Then I felt sideways for the projecting hooks, and, as I did so, my feet were grasped from behind, and I was violently tugged backward.
When it came, I saw that he was a sturdy man, cheaply but not shabbily dressed; his head was bent under his body, and he lay crumpled up close to the fence, as though he had been flung violently against it.
My heart beat so violently that I feared my wound would open.
But that expression of violently in love' is so hackneyed, so doubtful, so indefinite, that it gives me very little idea.
It is a sound, for its size, far more terrific to your soul than that of a world coming violently to an end.
Again and again I tried to reach it, until at length, maddened with the thought of my situation, I swayed myself violently by striking my foot against the side of the rock, and at the instant that I approached the large root caught desperately at it, and transferred myself to it.
Sir James did make proposals to me for Frederica; but Frederica, who was born to be the torment of my life, chose to set herself so violently against the match that I thought it better to lay aside the scheme for the present.
Piombo rubbed his hands violently,--with him the surest symptom of joy; he had taken to this habit at court when he saw Napoleon becoming angry with those of his generals and ministers who served him ill or committed blunders.
When factions are carried too high and too violently, it is a sign of weakness in princes; and much to the prejudice, both of their authority and business.
Damn it all," I said, more violently because I had an inkling my motive was none too creditable, "I don't want to know you.