Mutation

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MUTATION, French law. This term is synonymous with change, and is particularly applied to designate the change which takes place in the property of a thing in its transmission from one person to another; permutation therefore happens when, the owner of the thing sells, exchanges or gives it. It is nearly synonymous with transfer. (q.v.) Merl. Repert. h.t.

References in periodicals archive ?
A varicella-zoster virus mutation identified in 1998 and thought to be a "serendipitous chance mutation" was isolated for a second time in 1999, this time in an elderly man presenting with severe facial lesions, reported Graham A.
VIS410 is designed to identify a conformational epitope on the stem region of influenza hemagglutinin (HA) protein which is not conserved across all influenza A strains and is opposed to virus mutation.
More species of bird flu virus found in pigs means higher chance for virus mutation and for humans to be infected,'' Lo said.
The Commission's rationale is that the milder strains of avian flu can mutate into high pathogenic strains which can cause devastating epidemics: the newly-proposed legislation, therefore, will require EU member states to introduce and reinforce surveillance and control measures against the low pathogenic viruses, in order to prevent virus mutation.
The Commission says the milder strains of avian flu can mutate into high pathogenic strains which can cause devastating epidemics: the newly proposed legislation, therefore, will require the EU's member states to introduce and reinforce surveillance and control measures against the low pathogenic viruses, in order to prevent virus mutation.
Lai Hsiu-shui, a professor of animal husbandry at National Taiwan University, told the same news conference that due to virus mutation a new strain of hoof-and-mouth disease could emerge in Taiwan "at any time" and did not necessarily have to be imported from outside.
The worldwide concern is that rapid spread among birds could lead to a virus mutation that would sustain human-to-human transmission.
The sophistication of Genaco's technology is such that within one week, the company can adapt the test to detect any new virus mutation that is discovered.