white collar crime

(redirected from White-Collar Crimes)
Also found in: Financial.

white collar crime

n. a generic term for crimes involving commercial fraud, cheating consumers, swindles, insider trading on the stock market, embezzlement and other forms of dishonest business schemes. The term comes from the out of date assumption that business executives wear white shirts and ties. It also theoretically distinguishes these crimes and criminals from physical crimes, supposedly likely to be committed by "blue collar" workers.

References in periodicals archive ?
Fallout from recent fraudulent activities has been great: the constant media frenzy; stock market jitters, tougher federal legislation for white-collar crimes, and lost 401(k)s.
Technological advances, like the Internet, combined with a well educated, aging population have fueled a rise in white-collar crimes, even as the rates of murder, robbery, assault, and other types of violent and property crimes have declined or flattened.
White-collar crimes come in many different forms, including money laundering; credit card, health care, insurance, securities, and/or telecommunications fraud; intellectual property and computer crimes; and identity theft.
It is important to look at white-collar crimes because such offenses cause a great deal more physical, financial, and moral harm than all street crimes put together in American society.
National Police Agency chief Setsuo Tanaka told police investigators on Tuesday to beef up investigations into organized and white-collar crimes.
* FRAUD AND WHITE-COLLAR CRIMES are typically committed by older, better-educated offenders.
Second, let's consider that white-collar crimes are committed mostly by whites from the middle and upper classes and not by the poor and working classes, which contain a high percentage of black single-female-headed households.
The chapter on investigative reports and case preparation provides a strong foundation for investigators who are untrained in documenting white-collar crimes. The book closes with a glossary that defines financial and legal terms with which white-collar investigators at all experience levels should be familiar.
The myths of the criminal type and the law-abiding majority together function as a sort of "master myth," from which a cluster of subsidiary myths serves to "explain away" as exceptional those especially egregious white-collar crimes that come to public attention.
White-collar crimes can be intricate, and the investigation leading to a warrant application may be complex.
Although fewer CPAs participate in criminal cases than in civil cases, the liberal extension of the RICO statute to white-collar crimes has fostered a growing need for CPAs to clearly explain and illustrate the alleged crime committed.
The increasingly multinational nature of white-collar crimes makes this unlikely in some cases.