Window


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WINDOW. An opening made in the wall of a house to admit light and air, and to enable those who are in to look out.
     2. The owner has a right to make as many windows in his house when not built on the line of his property as he may deem proper, although by so doing be may destroy the privacy of his neighbors. Bac. Ab. Actions in general, B.
     3. In cities and towns it is evident that the owner of a house cannot open windows in the partition wall without the consent of the owner of the adjoining property, unless he possesses the right of having ancient lights. (q.v.) The opening of such windows and destroying the privacy of the adjoining property, is not, however, actionable; the remedy against such encroachment is by obstructing them, without encroaching upon the rights of the party who opened them, so as to prevent a right from being acquired by twenty years use. 3 Camp. 82.

References in classic literature ?
No, I won't," said Pierre, pushing Anatole aside, and he went up to the window.
Just as I was turning away wearily from the window to go back to the bedroom and make a second attempt to complete the unfinished entry in my journal, I smelt the odour of tobacco-smoke stealing towards me on the heavy night air.
We'll see later how he got away from The Yellow Room," replied Rouletabille, "but he must have left the pavilion by the vestibule window.
As she stepped nearer and peered longingly out, she saw something else: she saw, only a little way below the window, the wide, flat tin roof of Miss Polly's sun parlor built over the porte-cochere.
But there were signs that this window had been recently open; the cobwebs were disturbed, and there were fresh dirty footmarks upon the window-sill.
In the evening, when little Kay was at home, and half undressed, he climbed up on the chair by the window, and peeped out of the little hole.
Two little white patches moved vaguely through the darkness, the stairs creaked, the door whined, and they were at the front room window.
Growing dawn had already turned the window panes from black to gray when Sir Walter got abruptly to his feet.
I closed the door noiselessly and crept towards the window.
the distinct voice of a widow, seated in an arm-chair by the window, asked her son.
I listened at the window attentively before I ventured on taking my lantern out of my coatpocket.
She sat and looked out of the window, curious to see something of the road over which she was being driven to the queer place Mrs.